ILAM

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Title Audio Collection Descriptionsort icon Composer Date All terms
Chebusit | East African

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ILAM

A praise song with Kibugandet 5 string wish bone lyre, resonated on a parafin tin. The solo singer, singing in falsetto, praises his country and many of its desirable places. He mentions, among others, the Administrative centre at Kericho, some 25 miles away, which he says is 'full of words', referring to the information service supplied to the country by the office of the District Commissioner. This wishbone shaped frame lyre is help onto the top of an empty 4 gallon parafin tin. At the end of his song the lyre slipped off its resonator.
Details from ILAM field card number: D6L 4

1950-09-15 East African | ILAM | Indigenous music | Kapkatet | Kenya | Kericho | Kibugandet lyre | Kipsigis | Kipsigis district | Ngasura, Kinutit Arap | Praise song
Arap Tapartele olei yo lalei yo | East African

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ILAM

A praise song with a Chepkongo 6 string bowl lyre. The player flips the bridge of the lyre with a finger tip as he plays. The song is largely a repetition by the chorus of the words "olei yo lalei yo" a kind of "Hey - nonny - nonny."
The singer also brings into his song the names of many places he has visited and likes in common with his audience.
Both Kipsigis and Nandi are noted for their patriotism, their love of country as such, which they frequently express in song. This is comparitively rare with Bantu people who do not, as a rule, praise the beauty of the countryside and are mostly insensitive to scenery. Details from ILAM field card number: D6L 1

1950-09-15 Bowl lyre | Chepkongo bowl lyre | Chepkwony,Kepkoske Arap | East African | ILAM | Indigenous music | Kenya | Kipsigis | Kipsigis | Kipsigis | Praise song | Vocal
Ho - Jambo Bwana | East African

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ILAM

A praise song with a Chepkongo 6 string bowl lyre. The player flips the bridge of the lyre with a finger tip as he plays. The  'Hey - nonny - nonny' words of the song are " Ho - Jambo Bwana". "How do you do, Master."
This was impromptu refering to the recorder of the item. The remainder of the lyric mentions places of mutual interst and affection in the minds of the audience.
Both Kipsigis and Nandi are noted for their patriotism, their love of country as such, which they frequently express in song. This is comparitively rare with Bantu people who do not, as a rule, praise the beauty of the countryside and are mostly insensitive to scenery.
Details from ILAM field card number: D6L 2

 (Performer)
Kepkoske Arap Chepkwony (Composer)

1950-09-15 Bowl lyre | Chepkongo bowl lyre | Chepkwony,Kepkoske Arap | East African | ILAM | Indigenous music | Kapsabet Kenya Nandi district | Kericho | Kipsigis | Kipsigis district | Praise song | Vocal
Arap Chemonget | East African

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ILAM

A praise song with Chepkongo 6 string bowl lyre. This lyre is strummed and fingered like the Bangwe zither of Nyasaland. The right hand strums the strings and the left mutes or opens the 6 strings, making it possible to play two or three chords on the open un-muted strings. The singer mentions by name his home village, places of common interest to his friends. The player flips the body of his lyre on the 2nd and 4th beats. In common with several African verse makers, the singer sings in couplets, repeating the second phrase and making it the first line of the next.
Details from ILAM field card number: D6L 3

1950-09-15 Bowl lyre | Chepkongo bowl lyre | Chepkwony, Kepkoske Arap | East African | ILAM | Indigenous music | Kapkatet | Kenya | Kericho | Kipsigis | Kipsigis district | Praise song | Sitonik, Kipkemo Arap
Arap Kapero | East African

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ILAM

A topical song with Kipukandet 6 string bowl lyre (5 or 6 string pentatonic lyre used by Nandi tribe in Kenya, also known as Kibugantet and Chepkong.) One day a friend called on Arap Kapero unexpectedly. He sang "Had I a shilling I would have bought flour to make bread for you." The accompaniment of this song is interesting for the extra half bar just prior to the start of each verse.

Kipkeino Arap Rop (Performer)
Composer not specified

1950-00-00 East African | ILAM | Kapsabet Nandi district Kenya | Nandi | Rop, Kipkeino Arap | Topical song
Kolasi | East African

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ILAM

A topical song with accordian and struck iron. The accordian is used as a ground which creates a happy noise but has little, if any, melodic or harmonic relationship to the tonality or mode of the voice."The father of the girl I want to marry came to Mombasea leaving his daughter at home - so I came to Mombasa too and said to him 'Now how about it - I want to discuss the marriage arrangements'."
Further details refer ILAM field card number: F3B 5

1952-05-24 Accordion | Chinda Kamwana | East African | Folk music | ILAM | Indigenous music | Kenya | Kiamuthambi | Kikuyu | Kikuyu territory | Struck iron | Topical song
Mwomboko | East African

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ILAM

A topical song with accordian and struck iron. The accordian is used as a ground which creates a happy noise but has little, if any, melodic or harmonic relationship to the tonality or mode of the voice.
Song to accompany a town dance in which men and women dance together in pairs, after the fashion of Europeans.
Further details refer ILAM field card number: F3B 6

1952-05-24 Accordion | Chinda Kamwana | East African | Folk music | ILAM | Indigenous music | Kenya | Kiamuthambi | Kikuyu | Kikuyu territory | Struck iron | Topical song
Mucungwa | East African

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ILAM

A very simple dance song, sung in unison.
Further details refer ILAM field card number: D6T 8

1950-09-23 Dance song | East African | Folk music | Forest Hall district | ILAM | Indigenous music | Kenya | Kikuyu | Kikuyu | Wairimu,Tabitha
Sungi akumba | Central African

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ILAM

A Zande dance with Kponingbo xylophone (log zylophone with keys on banana stems. The tuning corresponds in absolute pitch with that of harp strings). "Sungi kumba wa sa gasi li Sungi akumba ai gibolo. It is a bad housewife who does not work for a husband. A woman who can't work is no good at all." These loose note xylophones are played by three and sometimes four men sitting on either side of the instrument. The Zande dance is performed in a circle to the cheerful sound of the xylophone. All the dancers move in unison with small steps in a set pattern which ensures that the circle moves around gradually in an anti-clockwise direction. A characteristic gesture by Zande dancers is the holding out of hands, palms upwards, gently raising and lowering the forearms in time with the music.

Composer not specified
Nakule (Performer)

1952-08-31 Bandiya | Chief Gatanga | Folk - Central African | ILAM | Kponingbo xylophone | Nakule | Nguru | Northern Congo | Zande
Bandiya yo | Central African

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ILAM

A Zande dance with Kponingbo xylophone (log zylophone with keys on banana stems. The tuning corresponds in absolute pitch with that of harp strings). "We live here in the district of Bandiya." These loose note xylophones are played by three and sometimes four men sitting on either side of the instrument. The Zande dance is performed in a circle to the cheerful sound of the xylophone. All the dancers move in unison with small steps in a set pattern which ensures that the circle moves around gradually in an anti-clockwise direction. A characteristic gesture by Zande dancers is the holding out of hands, palms upwards, gently raising and lowering the forearms in time with the music.

Composer not specified
Nakule (Performer)

1952-08-31 Bandiya | Buta | Chief Gatanga | Folk - Central African | ILAM | Kponingbo xylophone | Nakule | Nguru | Northern Congo | Zande | Zande dance
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