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Browsing : Journals (54 items)


1. Abasebenzi
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1973-1976  
Description
Abasebenzi, published by the Wages Commission, Student's Representative Council at the University of Cape Town, aimed to create awareness by informing workers in the Western Cape (mainly Cape Town) of the importance of worker unity, organisation and representation in order to protect their interests, better their wages and working conditions and end worker exploitation. Information about collective bargaining, formation of liaison committees, works committees and trade unions was made available in order to empower workers in their struggle. Abasebenzi also endeavoured to assist individual workers with particular problems and articles included information about overtime, unemployment insurance and workmen's compensation. In 1976, five issues and all future issues were banned and publication was forced to cease. Abasebenzi was publised in Zulu and Xhosa and the digitised issues are English transcriptions.
Relation
1973 March
1973 April Number 2
1973 June Number 3
1973 September Number 4
1974 April Number 1
1974 May
1974 May Number 3
1974 June Number 4
1974 September
1974 November Number 7
1974 December Number 8
1975 January Number 1
1975 March Number 5
1975 April Number 3
1975 May Number 4
1975 May Number 6
1975 June
1975 July Number 5
1975 October Number 7
1975 November Number 8
1976 January Number 1
1976 February Number 2
1976 March Number 3
2. African Communist, 1959 - 1994
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1959 - 1994  
Description
The SACP did not publicly announce its existence until the state of emergency was declared by the government after the police massacres of Sharpeville and Langa in 1960. The delay had been due to fears amongst some in the SACP leadership that a premature announcement might prejudice work in the liberation movement as a whole. But growing pressure from the rank and file of the SACP for a more structured system of propagating communist policies led to the publication in October 1959 of The African Communist in cyclostyled quarto form. Under the heading "This Magazine" the journal stated: "This magazine, 'The African Communist', has been started by a group of Marxist-Leninists in Africa, to defend and spread the inspiring and liberating ideas of Communism in our great Continent, and to apply the brilliant scientific method of Marxism to the solution of its problems. It is being produced in conditions of great difficulty and danger. Nevertheless we mean to go on publishing it, because we know that Africa needs Communist thought, as dry and thirsty soil needs rain."
Relation
1959, No 1, October
1960, No 2, April
1960, No 3, September
1961, No 4, January
1961, No 5, May
1961, No 6, July
1961, No 7, September
1962, No 8, January
1962, No 9, April
1962, No 10, July
1962, No 11, October
1963, No 12, January
1963, No 13, April
1963, No 14, July
1963, No 15, October
1964, No 16, January
1964, No 17, April
1964, No 18, April
1964, No 19, October
1965, No 20, January
1965, No 21, April
1965, No 22, Third Quarter
1965, No 23, Fourth Quarter
1966, No 24, First Quarter
1966, No 25, Second Quarter
1966, No 26, Third Quarter
1966, No 27, Last Quarter
1967, No 28, First Quarter
1967, No 29, Second Quarter
1967, No 30, Third Quarter
1967, No 31, Fourth Quarter
1968, No 32, First Quarter
1968, No 33, Second Quarter
1968, No 34, Third Quarter
1968, No 35, Fourth Quarter
1969, No 36, First Quarter
1969, No 37, Second Quarter
1969, No 38, Third Quarter
1969, No 39, Fourth Quarter
1970, No 40, First Quarter
1970, No 41, Second Quarter
1970, No 42, Third Quarter
1970, No 43, Fourth Quarter
1971, No 44, First Quarter
1971, No 45, Second Quarter
1971, No 46, Third Quarter
1971, No 47, Fourth Quarter
1972, No 48, First Quarter
1972, No 49, Second Quarter
1972, No 50, Third Quarter
1972, No 51, Fourth Quarter
1973, No 52, First Quarter
1973, No 53, Second Quarter
1973, No 54, Third Quarter
1973, No 55, Fourth Quarter
1974, No 56, First Quarter
1974, No 57, Second Quarter
1974, No 58, Third Quarter
1974, No 59, Fourth Quarter
1975, No 60, First Quarter
1975, No 61, Second Quarter
1975, No 62, Third Quarter
1975, No 63, Fourth Quarter
1976, No 64, First Quarter
1976, No 65, Second Quarter
1976, No 66, Third Quarter
1976, No 67, Fourth Quarter
1977, No 68, First Quarter
1977, No 69, Second Quarter
1977, No 70, Third Quarter
1977, No 71, Fourth Quarter
1978, No 72, First Quarter
1978, No 73, Second Quarter
1978, No 74, Third Quarter
1978, No 75, Fourth Quarter
1979, No 76, First Quarter
1979, No 77, Second Quarter
1979, No 78, Third Quarter
1979, No 79, Fourth Quarter
1980, No 80, First Quarter
1980, No 81, Second Quarter
1980, No 82, Third Quarter
1980, No 83, Fourth Quarter
1981, No 84, First Quarter
1981, No 85, Second Quarter
1981, No 86, Third Quarter
1981, No 87, Fourth Quarter
1982, No 88, First Quarter
1982, No 89, Second Quarter
1982, No 90, Third Quarter
1982, No 91, Fourth Quarter
1983, No 92, First Quarter
1983, No 93, Second Quarter
1983, No 94, Third Quarter
1983, No 95, Fourth Quarter
1984, No 96, First Quarter
1984, No 97, Second Quarter
1984, No 98, Third Quarter
1984, No 99, Fourth Quarter
1985, No 100, First Quarter
1985, No 101, Second Quarter
1985, No 102, Third Quarter
1985, No 103, Fourth Quarter
1986, No 104, First Quarter
1986, No 105, Second Quarter
1986, No 106, Third Quarter
1986, No 107, Fourth Quarter
1987, No 108, First Quarter
1987, No 109, Second Quarter
1987, No 110, Third Quarter
1987, No 111, Fourth Quarter
1988, No 112, First Quarter
1988, No 113, Second Quarter
1988, No 114, Third Quarter
1988, No 115, Fourth Quarter
1989, No 116, First Quarter
1989, No 117, Second Quarter
1989, No 118, Third Quarter
1989, No 119, Fourth Quarter
1990, No 120, First Quarter
1990, No 121, Second Quarter
1990, No 122, Third Quarter
1990, No 123, Fourth Quarter
1991, No 124, First Quarter
1991, No 125, Second Quarter
1991, No 126, Third Quarter
1991, No 127, Fourth Quarter
1992, No 128, First Quarter
1992, No 129, Second Quarter
1992, No 130, Third Quarter
1992, No 131, Fourth Quarter
1993, No 132, First Quarter
1993, No 133, Second Quarter
1993, No 134, Third Quarter
1993, No 135, Fourth Quarter
1994, No 136, First Quarter
1994, No 137, Second Quarter
1994, No 138, Third Quarter
3. Africanist News and Views
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1968-1973  
Description
Africanist News and Views, published by the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC) of Azania (South Africa), expressed the Pan-Africanist viewpoint in the struggle for liberation. The first organisational task of the PAC, according to Africanist News and Views, was to galvanise the African people into a revolutionary force with a clearly defined political philosophy of an African Government for the Africans by the Africans.
Relation
1968 September
1968 October
1970 March
1972 November
1972 December
1973 January
1973 April/May
4. Amandla-Matla
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1976-00-00  
Description
Amandla-Matla, a newsletter published and distributed underground by the African National Congress, supported and incited revolution against the South African Government.
Relation
1976 Volume 5 Number 1
1976 Volume 5 Number 2
5. Apdusa Views
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1984 - 1994  
Description
Apdusa Views was first published in 1984. In that issue it was stated: "Apdusa Views sees as its task to act as a watchdog of the oppressed people. We intend to comment to warn and to expose all those who act against the interest of the people. This duty we promise to carry out without fear or favour." As an affiliated body of the New Unity movement the successor to the Numbern-European Unity Movement (NEUM) Apdusa presented its views as the concept of equality of all human beings and the rejection of concepts like "superior and inferior" races; the principle of Numbern-racialism and a merciless attack on racialism in all its forms; the unity of all the oppressed African Coloured and Indian people; the policy of Numbern-collaboration which amongst other things meant the rejection of government-created dummy institutions designed for "inferior races"; the boycott as a weapon of struggle; a set of minimum Numbern-negotiable demands in the form of the "Ten Point Programme" as a basis for unity. The underlying theme running throughout its pages was that of developing the New Unity Movement into an effective force capable of intervening meaningfully in current events taking place in South Africa at the time; Apdusa Views was therefore a call on the oppressed especially the 'workers and peasants' to give their whole-hearted support to the ideals expressed by the Unity Movement.
Relation
1984 March
1984 May Number 1
1984 December Number 2
1985 February Number 3
1985 March
1985 May Special Issue Number 4
1985 May Number 5
1985 August Number 6
1985 August Number 7
1985 October Number 8
1985 November Special Issue Number 9
1986 January Number 10
1986 March Number 11
1986 April Number 12
1986 May Number 13
1986 June Number 14
1986 November Number 15
1987 January Special Issue
1987 February Number 16
1987 April Number 17
1987 June Number 18
1987 August Number 19
1988 March Number 20
1988 June Number 21
1988 September Number 22
1989 January Number 23
1989 April Special Issue
1989 May Number 24
1989 August Number 25
1989 August Number 26
1989 September Number 27
1989 October Number 28
1989 December Number 29
1990 January Number 30
1990 March Special Issue
1990 April Number 31
1990 June Number 32
1990 July Number 33
1990 August Number 34
1990 September Number 35
1990 November Number 36
1990 December Number 37
1991 January Number 38
1991 March Number 39
1991 May Number 40
1991 July Number 41
1991 August Number 42
1991 October Special Issue
1991 November Number 43
1992 February Number 44
1992 April Number 45
1992 August Number 46
1992 October Number 47
1992 November Special Issue
1992 December Special Issue
1993 February Special Issue
1993 September Number 48
1993 October Number 49
1993 December Number 50
1994 January Number 51
1994 March Number 52
1994 April Number 53
1994 July Number 54
1994 September Number 55
6. Arise! Vukani!
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1984 - 1989  
Description
Arise! Vukani! was published by Action Youth in Johannesburg representing the principles of Action Youth which are cited as anti-racism, anti-imperialism, anti-ethnicity, anti-collaboration and anti-sexism. It was an initiative by working, unemployed and student youth residing in Soweto, Lenasia, Eldorado Park, Riverlea, Bosmount and Fordsburg, all in the the Transvaal Province. Coverage and analysis was of liberation struggles taking place, mainly in South Africa, but also other national and class struggles in countries such as Grenada, El Salvador, Eritrea, Palestine and Namibia. Support was also given to Third World countries in which ruling parties were engaged in the process of socialist reconstruction such as Zimbabwe, Angola and Mozambique.
Relation
1984/1985 Volume 1 Number 1 September/October
1984/1985 Volume 1 Number 2 December/January
1985 Volume 1 Number 4 April/May
1985 Volume 1 Number 5 September/October
1986 Volume 1 Number 6 March/April
1986/1987 Volume 2 Number 1 Review/January
1987 Volume 2 Number 3 March/June
1989 September
7. Black Review
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1972 - 1976  
Description
Black Review, was published as an irregular annual by Black Community Programmes (BCP),Durban, which was a major organization within the Black Conciousness movement. It was intended as a survey of contemporary events and trends in the Black community. An exhaustive range of subjects includes Black initiatives in politics, health, education, self help projects, community programmes, arts and entertainment, youth and students organizations, work and sport. Black Review was compiled in 1972 by Khoapa, M. Pascal Gwala in 1973 and Thoko Mbanjwa in 1974/75. BCP was banned in October 1977. The language meduim was English.
Relation
1972
1973
1974/75
1975/76
8. Black Sash / Sash
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1956 - 1995  
Description
Sash, originally published as Black Sash, is a detailed record of the activities of the Black Sash organisation: the petitions, protests, marches, vigils, press releases and Conference papers which reflect the modus operandi of their desire to bring about change in the legislation which was, in their opinion, discriminatory and the cause of untold human suffering, hardship and poverty. Issues such as the Pass Laws, migrant labour, forced removals, indefinite detention without trial, Group Areas Act, the Bantu Education Act and in later years land reform were all brought to the attention of the apathetic public in an attempt to mount pressure against the Government to bring about a change in policy. The Black Sash acted as a constant reminder to the white electorate conscience that complacency would not effect change and action was necessary. The journal reflects the detailed efforts of these women from two aspects. The first one being the practical way in which the Black Sash Advice Offices helped hundreds of Africans experiencing problems as a direct result of the unjust Pass Laws. The second aspect was contained in their well documented and researched reporting on current political situations, State legislation and the effects thereof and other issues which they felt ought to be changed.
Relation
1956, Volume 1 Number 1, January
1956, Volume 1 Number 2, February
1956, Volume 1 Number 3, March
1956, Volume 1 Number 4, April
1956, Volume 1 Number 5, May
1956, Volume 1 Number 6, June
1956, Volume 1 Number 7, July
1956, Volume 1 Number 8, August
1956, Volume 1 Number 9, September
1956, Volume 1 Number 10, October
1956, Volume 1 Number 11, November
1956/1957, Volume 1 Number 12, December/January
1957, Volume 2 Number 1, February
1957, Volume 2 Number 2, March
1957, Volume 2 Number 3, April
1957, Volume 2 Number 4, May
1957, Volume 2 Number 5, June
1957, Volume 2 Number 6, July
1957, Volume 2 Number 7, August
1957, Volume 2 Number 8, September
1957, Volume 2 Number 8, October
1957, Volume 2 Number 9, November
1957, Volume 2 Number 10, December
1958, Volume 2 Number 11, January
1958, Volume 3 Number 3, February
1958, Volume 3 Number 4, March
1958, Volume 3 Number 5, April
1958, Volume 3 Number 6, May
1958, Volume 3 Number 7/8, June/July
1958, Volume 3 Number 9, August
1958, Volume 3 Number 10, September
1958, Volume 3 Number 11, October
1958, Volume 3 Number 12, November
1958, Volume 3 Number 13, December
1959, Volume 3 Number 14, January
1959, Volume 3 Number 15, February
1959, Volume 3 Number 16, March
1959, Volume 3 Number 17, April
1959, Volume 3 Number 18, May
1959, Volume 3 Number 19, June/July
1959, Volume 3 Number 20, August
1959, Volume 3 Number 21, September
1959, Volume 3 Number 22, October
1959, Volume 3 Number 23, November
1959/1960, Volume 4 Number 1, December/January
1960, Volume 4 Number 2, February
1960, Volume 4 Number 3, March
1960, Volume 4 Number 4, August
1960, Volume 4 Number 5, September
1960, Volume 5 Number 1, December
1961, Volume 5 Number 2, March
1961, Volume 5 Number 3, June
1961, Volume 5 Number 4, September
1961, Volume 5 Number 5, December
1962, Volume 6 Number 1, March
1962, Volume 6 Number 2, June
1962, Volume 6 Number 3, October
1962/1963, Volume 6 Number 4, December/January
1963, Volume 7 Number 1, March/April
1963, Volume 7 Number 2, July
1963, Volume 7 Number 3, October/November
1963/1964, Volume 7 Number 4, December/February
1964, Volume 8 Number 1/2, June/July
1964, Volume 8 Number 3, October/November
1965, Volume 9 Number 1, March/April
1965, Volume 9 Number 2, May/July
1965, Volume 9 Number 3, August/October
1965/1966, Volume 9 Number 4, November/January
1966, Volume 10 Number 1, February
1966, Volume 10 Number 2, May/July
1966, Volume 10 Number 3, August/October
1966/1967, Volume 10 Number 4, November/January
1967, Volume 11 Number 1, February/April
1967, Volume 11 Number 2, May/July
1967, Volume 11 Number 3, November
1968, Volume 11 Number 4, February
1968, Volume 12 Number 1, May
1968, Volume 12 Number 2, August
1968, Volume 12 Number 3, November
1969, Volume 12 Number 4, February
1969, Volume 13 Number 1, May
1969, Volume 13 Number 2, August
1969, Volume 13 Number 3, November
1970, Volume 13 Number 4, February
1970, Volume 14 Number 1, May
1970, Volume 14 Number 2, September
1970, Volume 14 Number 3, December
1971, Volume 14 Number 4, March
1971, Volume 15 Number 1, June
1971, Volume 15 Number 2, September
1971, Volume 15 Number 3, December
1972, Volume 15 Number 4, March
1972, Volume 16 Number 1, June
1972, Volume 16 Number 2, August
1972, Volume 16 Number 3, November
1973, Volume 16 Number 4, February
1973, Volume 16 Number 5, May
1973, Volume 16 Number 6, August
1973, Volume 16 Number 7, November
1974, Volume 16 Number 8, February
1974, Volume 17 Number 1, May
1974, Volume 17 Number 2, August
1974, Volume 17 Number 3, November
1975, Volume 17 Number 4, February
1975, Volume 18 Number 1, May
1975, Volume 18 Number 2, August
1975, Volume 18 Number 3, November
1976, Volume 18 Number 4 February
1976, Volume 18 Number 5, May
1976, Volume 18 Number 6, August
1976, Volume 18 Number 7, November
1977, Volume 18 Number 8, February
1977, Volume 19 Number 1, May
1977, Volume 19 Number 2, August
1977, Volume 19 Number 3, November
1978, Volume 19 Number 4, February
1978, Volume 20 Number 1, May
1978, Volume 20 Number 2, August
1978, Volume 20 Number 3, November
1979, Volume 20 Number 4, February
1979, Volume 21 Number 1, May
1979, Volume 21 Number 2, August
1979, Volume 21 Number 3, November
1980, Volume 21 Number 4, February
1980, Volume 22 Number 1, May
1980, Volume 22 Number 2, August
1980, Volume 22 Number 3, November
1981, Volume 23 Number 4, February
1981, Volume 24 Number 1, May
1981, Volume 24 Number 2, August
1981, Volume 24 Number 3, November
1982, Volume 24 Number 4, January
1982, Volume 25 Number 1, May
1982, Volume 25 Number 2, August
1982, Volume 25 Number 3, November
1983, Volume 25 Number 4, February
1983, Volume 26 Number 1, May
1983, Volume 26 Number 2, August
Law Without Justice: a dangerous prospect [Supplement]
1983, Volume 26 Number 3, November
1984, Volume 26 Number 4, February
1984, Volume 27 Number 1, May
1984, Volume 27 Number 2, August
1984, Volume 27 Number 3, November
1985, Volume 27 Number 4, February
1985, Volume 28 Number 1, May
1985, Volume 28 Number 2, August
1985, Volume 28 Number 3, November
1986, Volume 28 Number 4, February
1986, Volume 29 Number 2, August
1986, Volume 29 Number 3, November
1987, Volume 29 Number 4, February
1987, Volume 30 Number 1, May
1987, Volume 30 Number 2, August
1987, Volume 30 Number 3, December
1988, Volume 30 Number 4, March
1988, Volume 31 Number 1, June
1988, Volume 31 Number 2, September
1988, Volume 31 Number 3, December
1989, Volume 31 Number 4, March
1989, Volume 32 Number 1, May
1989, Volume 32 Number 2, September
1990, Volume 32 Number 3, January
1990, Volume 33 Number 1, May
1990, Volume 33 Number 2, September
1991, Volume 33 Number 3, January
1991, Volume 34 Number 1, May Conference Issue
1991, Volume 34 Number 2, September
1992, Volume 34 Number 3, January
1992, Volume 35 Number 1, May
1992, Volume 35 Number 2, September
1993, Volume 35 Number 3, January
1993, Volume 36 Number 1, May
1993, Volume 36 Number 2, September
1994, Volume 36 Number 3, January
1994, Volume 37 Number 1, September
1995, Volume 37 Number 2, January
1995, Volume 37 Number 3, May
1995, Volume 37 Number 3, May, Anniversary Supplement
9. Bolt
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1970-1975  
Description
Bolt, a periodical covering English language studies focussing on contemporary South African reviews, criticism and creative writing. The magazine aimed to be apolitical, without imposing any limitations, adding literary excellence. The magazine features Peter Strauss' "Diary of a man reading Spenser"; poems by Lawrence Lerner; Douglas Livingstone; Oswald Mtshali; Christopher Mann; Ruth Keech; and fiction by Alan Paton and Fiona Morphet and George Brendon. Reviews of new books by Wally Serote; James Fenton. Bolt was succeeded by the journal, Staffrider.
Relation
1970 January/February Volume 1 Number 1
1970 August Volume 1 Number2
1970 Volume 1 Number 3
1971 March Volume 2 Number 1
1971 Number 5
1972 November Number 6
1973 March Number 7
1973 Poems; Supplement to April 1973
1973 June Number 8
1973 October Number 9
1974 May Number 10
1974 December Number 11
1975 July Number 12
10. Clarion Call
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1983 - 1991  
Description
Clarion Call was published as the official journal of the KwaZulu Government, as a record of their activities, and as a mouthpiece of the Inkatha Institute developed to foster the aims of Inkatha - "a liberation movement committed to non-violence, peaceful change and a negotiated future for South Africa". The youth of KwaZulu, in particular, were called upon to resist violence as a means of protest. Participation in community self help projects supported by the KwaZulu Government fostered strong community values and aimed at forging unity within the movement. Social issues such as pensions, job creation, food production and primary health care are discussed in Clarion Call as well as issues relating to resistance to the National Government's repressive machinery, as viewed by Inkatha.
Relation
1983 Volume 1 Number 1 August
1983 Volume 1 Number 3 October
1983 Volume 1 Number 4 November
1983 Volume 1 Number 5 December
1984 Volume 1 Number 7 February
1984 Volume 1 Number 8 March
1984 Volume 1 Number 9 April
1984 Volume 1 Number 10 May
1984 Volume 1 Number 11 June
1984 July/August
1984 October/November
1985 Volume 1
1985 Volume 2
1985 Volume 3
1985 Volume 4
1986 Volume 1
1986 Volume 2
1986 Volume 3
1987 Special Edition
1987 Volume 2
1988 Volume 1
1988 Volume 2
1988 Volume 3
1988 Special Edition
1989 Volume 1
1989 Volume 2
1989 Volume 3
1990 Volume 1
1990 Volume 2
1990 Volume 3
1991 Volume 1
1991 November
11. Congress Resister 1983 - 1989
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1983 - 1989  
Description
Congress Resister was published by the Transvaal Indian Congress (TIC), which was formed at the turn of the twentieth century by Mahatma Gandhi. It was not banned but was severely affected by the harsh repression of the period. By the mid-60s the activities of the TIC had declined and by the early 70s it was virtually non-existent. At this time, some activists in the Indian community were involved in Black Consciousness organisations. Others associated themselves with the non-racial policy of the 1950s Congress Alliance. In 1981, a meeting was held in Lenasia to discuss the response of the Indian community to the forthcoming elections for the South African Indian Council (SAIC). It was decided that the Transvaal Anti-SAIC Committee (TASC) be established to oppose the SAIC election. The Committee actively campaigned for a boycott of the SAIC elections in a style reminiscent of the Congress Alliance. The culmination of this process was a resounding boycott of the SAIC elections and the holding of the TASC Conference in January 1983. It was here that the decisions were taken to form the United Democratic Front (UDF) and to revive the TIC. On the formation of the UDF, the TIC affiliated to it. The TIC consciously promoted the idea of non-racialism, and sought to mobilise the Transvaal Indian community under the dual banner of the TIC and the UDF. This was done by house visits, mass meetings, pamphleteering and extensive campaigns to boycott the Tricameral Parliament, municipal elections and education. They also participated in national UDF campaigns and began organising the business sector through the TIC Business and Economy Group. After the unbanning of the ANC in 1990, TIC leaders and activists became active in the newly-formed ANC branches and its provincial and national structures, and ultimately the organisation was disbanded.
Relation
1983, Volume 1 No 1, September
1984, Volume 2 No 1, February
1984, Volume 2 No 2, July
1984, Volume 2 No 3, October
1985, April
1985, July
1985, Volume 3 No 3 October
1987, May Day Issue
1987, Volume 5 No 2, June
1987, Volume 5 No 3, August
1988, Volume 6 No 1, August
1988, Volume 6 No 2, November
1989, Volume 7 No 1, June
1989, Volume 7 No 2, August
12. Contact
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1954 - 1967  
Description
Contact, the official publication of the Liberal Party, was published monthly, in Pietermaritzburg, during the period January 1954 to December 1957. With effect from January 1958, publication began in Cape Town, on a fortnightly basis, and continued until publication ceased in January 1967. The Liberal Party was the only legal multi-racial party in South Africa during this period, but was dissolved in 1968, when legislation introduced by the Government made multi-racial parties illegal in South Africa. Contact, in defying apartheid, documented political struggles not only in the southern region of Africa but in Africa as a whole.
Relation
1954, January
1954, February
1954, March
1954, April
1954, May
1954, June/July
1954, August
1954, September
1954, October
1954, November
1954, December
1955, January
1955, February
1955, March
1955, April
1955, May
1955, June
1955, July
1955, August
1955, September
1955, October
1955, November
1955, December
1956, January
1956, February
1956, March
1956, April
1956, May
1956, June
1956, July
1956, August
1956, September
1956, October
1956, November
1956, December
1957, January
1957, February
1957, March
1957, April
1957, May
1957, June-July
1957, July-August
1957, September
1957, October
1957, November
1957, December
1958, Volume 1 No 1, 8 February
1958, Volume 1 No 2, 22 February
1958, Volume 1 No 3, 8 March
1958, Volume 1 No 4, 22 March
1958, Volume 1 No 5, 5 April
1958, Volume 1 No 6, 19 April
1958, Volume 1 No 7, 3 May
1958, Volume 1 No 8, 17 May
1958, Volume 1 No 9, 31 May
1958, Volume 1 No 10, 14 June
1958, Volume 1 No 11, 28 June
1958, Volume 1 No 12, 12 July
1958, Volume 1 No 13, 26 July
1958, Volume 1 No 14, 9 August
1958, Volume 1 No 15, 23 August
1958, Volume 1 No 16, 6 September
1958, Volume 1 No 17, 20 September
1958, Volume 1 No 18, 4 October
1958, Volume 1 No 19, 18 October
1958, Volume 1 No 20, 1 November
1958, Volume 1 No 21, 15 November
1958, Volume 1 No 22, 29 November
1958, Volume 1 No 23, 13 December
1958, Volume 1 No 24, 27 December
1959, Volume 2 No 1, 10 January
1959, Volume 2 No 2, 24 January
1959, Volume 2 No 3, 7 February
1959, Volume 2 No 4, 21 February
1959, Volume 2 No 5, 7 March
1959, Volume 2 No 6, 21 March
1959, Volume 2 No 7, 4 April
1959, Volume 2 No 8, 18 April
1959, Volume 2 No 9, 2 May
1959, Volume 2 No 10, 16 May
1959, Volume 2 No 11, 30 May
1959, Volume 2 No 12, 13 June
1959, Volume 2 No 13, 27 June
1959, Volume 2 No 14, 11 July
1959, Volume 2 No 15, 25 July
1959, Volume 2 No 16, 8 August
1959, Volume 2 No 17, 22 August
1959, Volume 2 No 18, 5 September
1959, Volume 2 No 19, 19 September
1959, Volume 2 No 20, 3 October
1959, Volume 2 No 21, 17 October
1959, Volume 2 No 22, 31 October
1959, Volume 2 No 23, 14 November
1959, Volume 2 No 24, 28 November
1959, Volume 2 No 25, 12 December
1959, Volume 2 No 26, 26 December
1960, Volume 3 No 1, 9 January
1960, Volume 3 No 2, 23 January
1960, Volume 3 No 3, 6 February
1960, Volume 3 No 4, 20 February
1960, Volume 3 No 5, 5 March
1960, Volume 3 No 6, 19 March
1960, Volume 3 No 7, 2 April
1960, Volume 3 No 8, 16 April
1960, Volume 3 No 9, 7 May
1960, Volume 3 No 10, 21 May
1960, Volume 3 No 12, 18 June
1961, Volume 4 No 1, 4 January
1961, Volume 4 No 2, 28 January
1961, Volume 4 No 3, 11 February
1961, Volume 4 No 4, 25 February
1961, Volume 4 No 5, 9 March
1961, Volume 4 No 6, 23 March
1961, Volume 4 No 7, 6 April
1961, Volume 4 No 8, 20 April
1961, Volume 4 No 9, 4 May
1961, Volume 4 No 10, 18 May
1961, Volume 4 No 11, 1 June
1961, Volume 4 No 12, 15 June
1961, Volume 4 No 13, 29 June
1961, Volume 4 No 14, 13 July
1961, Volume 4 No 15, 27 July
1961, Volume 4 No 16, 10 August
1961, Volume 4 No 17, 24 August
1961, Volume 4 No 18, 7 September
1961, Volume 4 No 19, 21 September
1961, Volume 4 No 20, 5 October
1961, Volume 4 No 21, 19 October
1961, Volume 4 No 22, 2 November
1961, Volume 4 No 23, 16 November
1961, Volume 4 No 24, 30 November
1961, Volume 4 No 25, 14 December
1961, Volume 4 No 26, 28 December
1962, Volume 5 No 1, 11 January
1962, Volume 5 No 2, 25 January
1962, Volume 5 No 3, 8 February
1962, Volume 5 No 4, 22 February
1962, Volume 5 No 5, 8 March
1962, Volume 5 No 6, 22 March
1962, Volume 5 No 7, 5 April
1962, Volume 5 No 8, 19 April
1962, Volume 5 No 9, 3 May
1962, Volume 5 No 10, 17 May
1962, Volume 5 No 11, 31 May
1962, Volume 5 No 12, 14 June
1962, Volume 5 No 13, 28 June
1962, Volume 5 No 14, 12 July
1962, Volume 5 No 15, 26 July
1962, Volume 5 No 16, 9 August
1962, Volume 5 No 18, 6 September
1962, Volume 5 No 19, 20 September
1962, Volume 5 No 20, 4 October
1962, Volume 5 No 21, 18 October
1962, Volume 5 No 22, 1 November
1962, Volume 5 No 23, 15 November
1962, Volume 5 No 24, 29 November
1962, Volume 5 No 25, 13 December
1962, Volume 5 No 26, 27 December
1963, Volume 6 No 1, 10 January
1963, Volume 6 No 2, 24 January
1963, Volume 6 No 3, 7 February
1963, Volume 6 No 4, 21 February
1963, Volume 6 No 5, 7 March
1963, Volume 6 No 6, 22 March
1963, Volume 6 No 7, 5 April
1963, Volume 6 No 8, 19 April
1963, Volume 6 No 9, 3 May
1963, Volume 6 No 10, 17 May
1963, Volume 6 No 11, 31 May
1963, Volume 6 No 12, 14 June
1963, Volume 6 No 13, 28 June
1963, Volume 6 No 14, 12 July
1963, Volume 6 No 15, 26 July
1963, Volume 6 No 16, 9 August
1963, Volume 6 No 17, 23 August
1963, Volume 6 No 18, 6 September
1963, Volume 6 No 19, 20 September
1963, Volume 6 No 20, 4 October
1963, Volume 6 No 21, 18 October
1963, Volume 6 No 22, 1 November
1963, Volume 6 No 23, 13 November
1963, Volume 6 No 24, 30 November
1963, Volume 6 No 25, 13 December
1964, Volume 7 No 1, 10 January
1964, Volume 7 No 2, 24 January
1964, Volume 7 No 3, 14 February
1964, Volume 7 No 4, 13 March
1964, Volume 7 No 5, 10 April
1964, Volume 7 No 6, 8 May
1964, Volume 7 No 7, 5 June
1964, Volume 7 No 8, 3 July
1964, Volume 7 No 9, 31 July
1964, Volume 7 No 10, 28 August
1964, Volume 7 No 11, 25 September
1964, Volume 7 No 12, 23 October
1964, Volume 7 No 13, 27 November
1964, Volume 7 No 14, December
1965, Volume 8 No 1, January
1965, Volume 8 No 2, February
1965, Volume 8 No 3, March
1965, Volume 8 No 4, April
1965, Volume 8 No 5, May
1965, Volume 8 No 6, June
1965, Volume 8 No 7, July
1965, Volume 8 No 8, September
1965, Volume 8 No 9, October
1965, Volume 8 No 10, December
1966, Volume 9 No 1, January
1966, Volume 9 No 2, March
1966, Volume 9 No 3, April
1966, Volume 9 No 4, July
1966, Volume 9 No 5, September
1966, Volume 9 No 6, October
1966, Volume 9 No 7, December
1967, Volume 10 No 1
13. Cosatu News
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1986-1990  
Description
Cosatu News, published by COSATU, the Congress of South African Trade Unions, documents the struggle of workers to gain power in the workplace in order to improve wages and work conditions and ultimately to replace capitalism with socialism. The organised, unified strength of workers was considered by COSATU to be the strongest force against oppression and repression. The process of building worker solidarity, including women, at local, regional and national level is well documented.
Relation
1986 November Number 2
1987 March
1987 May Number 4
1987 June , Number 5
1987, June 22
1988 May
May/June 1988, Special Congress Edition
1988 September Special Edition
1989 February Number 1
1989 March Number 2
1989 June Number 3
1990 March Number 1
1990 June Number 2
14. Crisis News
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1985 - 1989  
Description
Crisis News, published by the Western Province Council of Churches, Cape Town, "attempts to tell the truth of what is happening in our country", particularly in the Western Cape and from a theological point of departure. Accounts of human rights violations, detentions, torture, violence and police brutality are reported together with theological viewpoints about the deepening political and social crisis in South Africa, during the 1980's
Relation
1985 Number 1
1985 October Number 2
1985 November Number 3
1985 December Number 4
1985 Christmas Number 5
1986 March Number 6
1986 April Number 7
1986 May Number 8
1986 June Number 9
1986 July Number 10
1986 August Number 11
1986 November Number 12
1986 December Number 13
1987 March Number 14
1987 April/May Number 15
1987 June Number 16
1987 July/August Number 17
1987 November Number 18
1987 December Number 19
1988 February/March Number 20
1988 April/May Number 21
1988 June/July Number 22
1988 August Number 24
1988 October Number 25
1988 November Number 26
1989 February Number 27
1989 April Number 28
1989 May Number 29
1989 July Number 30
1989 August Number 31
1989 December Number 32
15. Critical Health
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1979 - 1994  
Description
Critical Health, edited and published by an Editorial Collective focused on health issues in the context of the prevailing socio-economic climate of unequal provision of health care facilities and health care services. The need for improved working conditions for nurses and other health care workers, including doctors, was discussed within the context of the formation of trade unions representing the health sector. Prevailing medical ethics in treating detainees, particularly those having been tortured, was probed. The continuing struggle for improved and equitable health services in South Africa where apartheid policies of fragmentation and politicisation of health services played havoc with the health of the nation was extensively documented in Critical Health.
Relation
1979, Number 1 November
1980, Number 2 March
1980, Number 3 July
1981, Number 4, February
1981, Number 5, May
1981, Number 6, November
1982, Number 7, April
1982, Number 8, September
1983, Number 9, May
1984, Number 10, June
1984, Number 11, December
1985, Number 12, May
1985, Number 13, August
1985, Number 14, October
1986, Number 15, May
1986, Numbers 16 and 17, September
1986, Number 18, December
1987, Number 19, April
1987, Number 20, October
1987, Number 21, December
1988, Number 22, April
1988, Number 23, August
1988, Number 24, October
1988, Number 25, December
1989, Number 26, May
1989, Number 27, August
1989, Number 28, October
1990, Number 30, June
1990, Numbers 31/32, August
1990, Number 33, November
1991, Number 34, June
1991, Number 35, November
1991, Numbers 36/37, December
1992, Number 38, March
1992, Number 39, July
1992, Number 40, September
1992, Number 41, December
1993, Number 42, April
1993, Number 43, July
1993, Number 44, September
1993, Number 45, December
1994, Number 46, July
16. Dawn
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1979 - 1988  
Description
The official policy of the African National Congress was one of non-violence. However, after fifty years of non-violent struggle, Umkhonto we Sizwe (meaning Spear of the Nation) was founded in 1961 as the military wing of the African National Congress, open to all races and set up in conjunction with the South African Communist Party in order to strengthen the struggle by using armed forces (guerilla warfare). Dawn, published as a monthly journal by the Umkhonto we Sizwe, documented the guerilla attacks on strategic targets within the Republic, thereby undermining and disorganising defence and security networks; reported the Government armed forces' attacks carried out in the frontline states against supposed terrorist bases with their resultant political and military impact. These were accompanied by discussions on the complementary nature of non-violent struggle and armed tactics which highlighted the necessity for a broad front of attack on the apartheid government. Calls were made for participation and unity of all sectors of the oppressed population, including women and youth and demands were made for the release of ANC leaders and other political prisoners.
Relation
1979, August, Volume 3 No 7
1979, September, Volume 3 No 8
1979, October, Volume 3 No 9
1979, December, Volume 3 No 11
1980, February, Volume 4 No 2
1980, May, Volume 4 No 5
1980, July, Volume 4 No 7
1980, August, Volume 4 No 8
1980, September, Volume 4 No 9
1980, October, Volume 4 No 10
1980, November, Volume 4 No 11
1980, December, Volume 4 No 12
1981, January, Volume 5 No 1
1981, March, Volume 5 No 2
1981, April, Volume 5 No 4
1981, May, Volume 5 No 5
1981, June, Volume 5 No 6
1981, July, Volume 5 No 7
1981, September, Volume 5 No 9
1981, October, Volume 5 No 10
1981, November/December, Volume 5 No 11
1982, January, Volume 6 No 1
1982, March, Volume 6 No 3
1982, April, Volume 6 No 4
1982, May, Volume 6 No 5
1982, June/July,Volume 6 No 6/7
1982, August/September, Volume 6 No 8/9
1982, October/November/December, Volume 6
1983, January, Volume 7 No 1
1983, February, Volume 7 No 2
1983, March, Volume 7 No 3
1983, April, Volume 7 No 4
1983, Volume 7 No 6, June
1983, Volume 7 No 7
1983, Volume 7 No 8
Supplement to Volume 7 No 9
1983, November/December, Volume 7
1984, Volume 8 No 1/2
1984, Volume 8 No 3
1984, Volume 8 No 4
1984, Volume 8 No 5
1984, Volume 8 No 6
1985, Volume 9 No 1
1985, Volume 9 No 2
1986, Volume 10 No 1
1986, Volume 10 No 2
1986, Volume 10 No 3
1986, Volume 10 No 4
1986, Volume 10 No 5
1986, Souvenir Issue
1987, Volume 11
1988, Volume 1 No 1
17. East Cape Update
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1987  
Description
East Cape Update, published by East Cape News Agencies in Grahamstown, aimed to provide a reliable index of in-depth information and analysis of the Eastern Cape region. This region had a rich history of democratic opposition to the white minority government and often led the way for other regions in implementing successful strategies of resistance. Yet, being one of the poorest regions of the country, lacking in economic infrastructure, its population poverty-stricken with high rates of unemployment, information about the suffering experienced at the hands of the state and its security forces was scarce. East Cape Update hoped to fill in the gaps created by press censorship and other constraints.
Relation
1987 July Volume 1 Number 1
18. Fosatu Worker News
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1979 - 1985  
Description
Fosatu Worker News was first published in 1979 with the formation of the Federation of South African Trade Unions and was distributed amongst all union members with the aim of uniting workers in the struggle for fair and equitable labour practice in South Africa. Articles included the growth of trade unionism representing the strength of workers united in their determination to obtain better wages, shorter working hours and basic worker rights. Boycotts and strikes to protest against unfair dismissals, retrenchments and worker harassment were covered in detail in an effort to keep workers informed and to encourage solidarity. Fosatu Worker News was preceded by Isisebenzi. Fosatu Worker News ceased publication in 1985.
Relation
1979, July
1979, 2nd edition October
1979, Special edition November
1980, 3rd edition February
1980, No 4 April
1980, No 5 June
1980, 6th edition August
1980, 7th edition October
1980, 8th edition November
1980, 9th edition December
1981, August
1982, March
1982, April
1982, May
1982, July
1983, February
1983, No 19 March
1983, No 20 April
1983, No 21 May
1983, No 22 July
1983, No 23 August
1983, No 24 September
1983, No 25 October
1983, No 26 November
1984, No 27 January/February
1984, No 29 May
1984, No 30 June/July
1984, No 31 August
1984, No 32 September
1984, No 33/34 October/November
1985, No 35/36 February/March
1985, No 37 May Day issue
1985, No 38 June
1985, No 39 July
1985, No 40 August
1985, No 41 September
1985, No 42 October
1985, No 43 November
1985, Special Edition Issue
19. Frank Talk
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1984 - 1990  
Description
Frank Talk, first published in March 1984, as the official publication of the Natal Region of AZAPO, the Azanian Peoples Organisation, was later published by an Editorial Collective, structured as an independent body corporate, but committed to a theoretical vision of a Black Consciousness ideology. "Frank Talk" was originally the pseudonym under which Steve Biko wrote several articles, later published in the journal and hence the title of the journal. Volume 2, September 1987, contains a full list of these articles. The theory of Black Consciousness is explored and related to issues of race and racism, theology, culture and and revolution. Several issues of the journal were banned for distribution in terms of government legislation but were later unbanned.
Relation
1984, Volume 1 Number 1 February/March
1984, Volume 1 Number 2/3 July/August
1984, Volume 1 Number 4 September/October
1984, Volume 1 Number 5 November/December
1985, Volume 1 Number 6 February/March
1987, Volume 2 September
1989/90, Volume 3
20. Grassroots
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1980 - 1990  
Description
Grassroots was started in 1980 as the first of a series of community newspapers designed to give a voice to the 'voiceless' and oppressed peoples of South Africa. Only 5000 copies of the first (March 1980) edition were printed although in subsequent years circulation grew to between fifteen and twenty thousand. Grassroots was made up of over 60 democratic organisations: the civics under Western Cape Civic Association (WCCA) and Cape Housing Action Committee (CHAC), women's and youth organisations, the youth under Cape Youth Congress (CYCO), many trade unions and the United Democratic Front (UDF) were all linked in some way. The members of these organisations kept Grassroots alive by giving news and selling the paper itself. Grassroots struggled financially, but was assisted by small donations and the advertising sold to small Cape Town traders. Eight months after Grassroots began, its first organiser, Johnny Issel, was banned. However, it survived many further attacks from the government, going on to help communities start their own newspapers: Saamstaan, for example, represented the oppressed communities of Oudtshoorn, Mossel Bay, George, Ladismith, Swellendam, Calitzdorp and many other small towns. It was largely through this democratising role that Grassroots fulfilled its potential by providing a voice for these communities, uniting them against oppression and injustice, and building opposition against apartheid.
Relation
1980 March
1980 April
1980 May/June
1980 August
1980 October
1980 December
1981 Volume 2 No 1 March
1981 Volume 2 No 2 April
1981 Volume 2 No 3 May
1981 Volume 2 No 4 June
1981 Volume 2 No 5 July
1981 Volume 2 No 6 August/September
1981 Volume 2 No 7 October
1981 Volume 2 No 8 November
1981 Volume 2 No 9 December
1982 Volume 3 No 1 February
1982 Volume 3 No 2 March
1982 Volume 3 No 3 April
1982 Volume 3 No 4 May
1982 Volume 3 No 5 June
1982 Volume 3 No 6 August
1982 Volume 3 No 7 September
1982 Volume 3 No 8 October
1982 Volume 3 No 9 November
1982 Volume 3 No 10 December
1983 Volume 4 No 1 February
1983 Volume 4 No 2 March
1983 Volume 4 No 3 April
1983 Volume 4 No 4 May
1983 Volume 4 No 5 June
1983 Volume 4 No 6 July
1983 Volume 4 No 7 September
1983 Volume 4 No 8 October
1983 Volume 4 No 9 November
1983 Volume 4 No 10 December
1984 Volume 5 No 1 January/February
1984 Volume 5 No 2 March
1984 Volume 5 No 3 April
1984 Volume 5 No 4 May
1984 Volume 5 No 5 June
1984 Volume 5 No 6 August
1984 Volume 5 No 7 November
1985 Volume 6 No 1 February
1985 Volume 6 No 2 March
1985 Volume 6 No 3 April
1985 Volume 6 No 4 June
1985 Volume 6 No 5 July
1985 Volume 6 No 6 August
1985 Volume 6 No 7 September
1985 Volume 6 No 8 October
1985 Volume 6 No 10 November
1985 Volume 6 No 11 December
1986 Volume 7 No 1 February
1986 Volume 7 No 2 March
1986 Volume 7 No 3 May
1986 Volume 7 No 4 June
1986 Volume 7 No 5 August
1986 Volume 7 No 6 September
1986 Volume 7 No 8 October
1986 Volume 7 No 9 December
1987 Volume 8 No 1 February
1987 Volume 8 No 2 March
1987 Volume 8 No 3 May
1987 Volume 8 No 4 June
1987 Volume 8 No 5 July
1987 Volume 8 No 6 August
1987 Volume 8 No 7 September
1987 Volume 8 No 8 October
1987 Volume 8 No 9 November
1987 Volume 8 No 10 December
1988 Volume 9 No 1 February
1988 Volume 9 No 2 March
1988 Volume 9 No 3 May
1988 Volume 9 No 4 July
1988 Volume 9 No 5 August
1988 Volume 9 No 6 September
1988 Volume 9 No 7 October
1988 Volume 9 No 8 November
1989 Volume 10 No 1 January
1989 Volume 10 No 2 May
1989 Volume 10 No 3 July
1989 Volume 10 No 5 September
1989 Volume 10 No 6 October
1989 Volume 10 No 7 November
1990 Volume 11 No 1 February
1990 Volume 11 No 2 March
21. Ikwezi
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1975 - 1979  
Description
Ikwezi, a Xhosa word meaning "rising star", was a Marxist-Leninist journal devoted to proletarian socialist revolution in Southern Africa, published in England by "a group of South African and Southern African revolutionaries with long histories of devotion to the struggle for freedom in Southern Africa". Ikwezi claimed to work within the mainstream liberation movements while aiming to help the process of building a Marxist-Leninist Party based on the Chinese model of revolution and the writings of Mao-Tse-Tung. The struggle was seen as both a national and a class struggle against colonial and imperial domination. Ikwezi took a firm stand against Russian social-imperialism regarding it as being the greater danger compared to American imperialism.
Relation
1975 November Volume 1 No 1
1976 March Volume 2 No 1
1976 August Volume 2 No 3
1976 December Volume 2 No 4
1977 April Number 5
1977 August Number 6
1977 December Number 7
1978 March Number 8
1978 June Number 9
1978 December Number 10
1979 March Number 11
1979 June Number 12
1979 October Number 13
1980 March Number 14
1980 October Number 15
1981 March Number 16
1981 June Number 17
1981 October Number 18
1982 March Number 19
1982 July Number 20
1982 October Number 21
22. Inqaba ya basebenzi
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1981 - 1990  
Description
Inqaba ya basebenzi, published in London by the Marxist Workers' Tendency of the African National Congress documents the workers' struggle for national liberation, democracy and socialism. Issues discussed include wage negotiations, improved working conditions, campaigns for a national minimum wage and exploitation of workers. Trade union action in the struggle for power by united workers is documented at length. Strikes by mineworkers, factory workers and transport workers are discussed in the context of increasing resistance to the repressive National Government apartheid policies. Capitalism, socialism, imperialism and reformism are issues debated at length, placed in the local South African context and in the wider international arena. Supplements to several of the issues contain theoretical and sometimes historical discourses on socialism, revolution, Marxism and Stalinism.
Relation
1981 January Number 1
1981 April Number 2
1981 July Number 3
1981 October Number 4
1982 January Number 5
1982 May Number 6
1982 August Number 7
1982 November Number 8
1983 February-April Number 9
1983 May-July Number 10
1983 August-October Number 11
1983-1984 November-February Number 12
1984 March-May Number 13
1984 June-August Number 14
1984 September-December Number 15
1985 January-June Number 16/17
1986 February Number 18/19
1986 September Number 20/21
1986 December Number 22
1987 April Number 23
1987 October Number 24/25
1988 April Number 26
1988 November Number 27
1990 January Number 28
23. Isisebenzi
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1973 - 1974  
Description
Produced by the "Wages Commission", Isisebenzi was a newspaper for workers in Durban and Pietermaritzburg. It was published about once a month and dealt with all matters of interest to workers, especially with their struggle for just wages and the right to organise. Isisebenzi No. 1 was produced by students who believed that a workers' newspaper would say more when it was written by workers; contributions in the form of articles, drawings and photographs were thus requested. The avowed philosophy was "to keep workers in touch with developments in other factories, unions and centres."
Relation
1973 January
1973 April
1974 January
1974 February
1974 March
1974 April
1974 May
1974 June
1974 Number 3 July
1974 Number 4 July
1974 October
24. Isizwe
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1985 - 1987  
Description
Isizwe = The Nation, the journal published by the United Democratic Front to stimulate discussion, debate and training within their ranks, consisted of articles on topics relevant to the national democratic struggle. These topics include educational articles on workerism, capitalism and other ideological standpoints, nationalization, trade unionism and the democratic processes involved in the organization of people's power.
Relation
1985 November Volume 1 Number 1
1986 March Volume 1 Number 2
1986 November Volume 1 Number 3
1987 March Volume 1 Number 4
1987 September Volume 2 Number 1
25. Izwi lase Township, 1982 - 1984
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1982 - 1984  
Description
Izwi lase Township was published by Ditshwantsho tsa Rona. It offered notes and views about current and past events. Though mainly concerned with Alexandra, since that was the home location of Ditshwantsho, it held that Alexandra was but a part of South Africa and shared in the general struggle of the country as a whole. The underlying philosophy of this publication was that it was necessary to understand society in order to change it; in line with this thinking the public was invited to participate in the paper by carrying out research and by contributing discussion. Ultimately, the ghetto status of the township was rejected, along with any strategies that attempted to divide it from other parts of the nation.
Relation
1982, April
1982, June/July
1982, August/September
1983, April/May
1983, July/August
1983, August/September
1983, December
1984, January
1984, July
26. Journal of Black Theology
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1972 - 1976  
Description
The Journal of Black Theology in South Africa published by the Black Theology Project in Pretoria is a scholarly publication dedicated to the exploration of African and Black theology and its growth and identity in relation to the national struggle for liberation in South Africa. Issues such as social class poverty politics and African culture are examined from a theological perspective and in light of the teachings of the Christian Church. Feminist theological issues and liberation theological premises are examined and discussed within the African context.
Relation
1987 May Volume 1 Number 1
1987 November Volume 1 Number 2
1988 May Volume 2 Number 1
1988 November Volume 2 Number 2
1989 May Volume 3 Number 1
1989 November Volume 3 Number 2
1990 May Volume 4 Number 1
1990 November Volume 4 Number 2
1991 May Volume 5 Number 1
1991 November Volume 5 Number 2
1992 May Volume 6 Number 1
1992 November Volume 6 Number 2
1993 May Volume 7 Number 1
1993 November Volume 7 Number 2
1994 May Volume 8 Number 1
1994 November Volume 8 Number 2
27. Liberation
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1953 - 1959  
Description
Liberation was founded in Johannesburg as a magazine of quality, focusing on issues of concern to Blacks and non-establishment Whites in South Africa. It was subtitled " a journal of democratic discussion", and was aimed at the intellectual elite. Contributors to the magazine include Michael Harmel, H.J. Simons, Joe Slovo, Nelson Mandela, Duma Nokwe, D. Dhlamini, M. Mokgohlwa, G. Fasulo, Helen Joseph, Govan Mbeki, Richard Cope and other critics of apartheid. Written in English, it was published by Daniel Tloome.
Relation
1953, Number 1, February
1953, Number 2, April
1953, Number 3, June
1953, Number 4, August
1953, Number 5, September
1953, Number 6, November
1954, Number 7, February
1954, Number 8, June
1954, Number 9
1954, Number 10
1955, Number 11
1955, Number 12, September
1955, Number 13, October
1955, Number 14, November
1955, Number 15, December
1956, Number 16, February
1956, Number 17, March
1956, Number 18, April
1956, Number 19, June
1956, Number 20, August
1956, Number 21, September
1956, Number 22, November
1957, Number 23, February
1957, Number 24, April
1957, Number 25, June
1957, Number 26, July
1957, Number 27, September
1957, Number 28, November
1958, Number 29, February
1958, Number 30, March
1958, Number 31, May
1958, Number 32, August
1958, Number 33, October
1958, Number 34, December
1959, Number 35, March
1959, Number 36, May
1959, Number 37, July
1959, Number 38, October
1959, Number 39, December
28. Mayibuye
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1967-1994  
Description
Mayibuye, published for many years as a small, underground newsletter, was one of three African National Congress publications alongside Sechaba and Dawn (Umkhonto we Sizwe). Circulation was limited and hampered by conditions of illegality. Publication began in late in 1966 with the aim of stimulating political debate and discussion to promote the voice of the banned Congress to the masses. Legal publication began in 1990 after the unbanning of the African National Congress. No issues of Mayibuye were published from June 1969 to January 1975 (inclusive) and December 1975 to May 1978 (inclusive).
Relation
1966, Special Issue,15 November
1967, Volume 1 No 3, 27 October
1967, Volume 1 No 5, 10 November
1967, Volume 1 No 7, 24 November
1967, Volume 1 No 8, 1 December
1967, Volume 1 No 9, 8 December
1967, Volume 1 No 10, 15 December
1967, Volume 1 No 11, 22 December
1968, Volume 2 No 1, 5 January
1968, Volume 2 No 2, 12 January
1968, Volume 2 No 3, 20 January
1968, Volume 2 No 4, 27 January
1968, Volume 2 No 5, 2 February
1968, Volume 2 No 6, 10 February
1968, Volume 2 No 7, 17 February
1968, Volume 2 No 9, 4 March
1968, Volume 2 No 10, 9 March
1968, Volume 2 No 11, 16 March
1968, Volume 2 No 12, 23 March
1968, Volume 2 No 13, 30 March
1968, Volume 2 No 14, 8 April
1968, Volume 2 No 15, 15 April
1968, Volume 2 No 16, 20 April
1968, Volume 2 No 17, 27 April
1968, Volume 2 No 19, 11 May
1968, Volume 2 No 20, 20 May
1968, Volume 2 No 21, 24 May
1968, Volume 2 No 22, 1 June
1968, Volume 2 No 23, 10 June
1968, Volume 2 No 24, 17 June
1968, Volume 2 No 26, 2 July
1968, Volume 2 No 27, 8 July
1968, Volume 2 No 28, 15 July
1968, Volume 2 No 29, 19 July
1968, Volume 2 No 31, 2 August
1968, Volume 2 No 32, 17 August
1968, Volume 2 No 33, 30 August
1968, Volume 2 No 34, 13 September
1968, Volume 2 No 35, 27 September
1968, Volume 2 No 36, 12 October
1968, Volume 2 No 37, 26 October
1968, Volume 2 No 38, 8 November
1968, Volume 2 No 39, 22 November
1968, Volume 2 No 40, 6 December
1968, Volume 2 No 41, 21 December
1969, Volume 3 No 1, 3 January
1969, Volume 3 No 2, February
1969, Volume 3 No 3, 7 February
1969, Volume 3 No 4, 14 February
1969, Volume 3 No 5, 28 February
1969, Volume 3 No 7, 28 March
1969, Volume 3 No 8, 11 April
1969, Volume 3 No 10, May
1975, Volume 1 No 3, 29 March
1975, Volume 1 No 4, 30 April
1975, Volume 1 No 6, June
1975, Volume 1 No 7, July
1975, Volume 1 No 8, September
1975, Volume 1 No 9, October
1978, Volume 1 No 1, 15 June
1978, Volume 1 No 2, 30 June
1978, Volume 1 No 3, 15 July
1978, Volume 1 No 4, 31 July
1978, Volume 1 No 5, 15 August
1978, Volume 1 No 6, 31 August
1978, Volume 1 No 7, 3 October
1980, No 6
1980, No 7
1980, No 8
1980, No 9
1980, No 10
1981, No 5
1981, No 6
1981, No 7
1981, No 8
1981, No 9
1982, No 5
1982, No 6
1982, No 7
1982, No 8
1982, No 9
1983, No 6
1983, No 8
1983, No 9
1984, No 5
1984, No 6
1984, No 7
1984, No 8
1984, No 9
1985, No 5/6
1985, No 7
1985, No 8
1988, No 9
1989, No 6
1991, February
1991, Volume 2 No 10, November
1991, Volume 2 No 11, December
1992, Volume 3 No 1, February
1992, Volume 3 No 10, November
1992, Volume 3 No 9, October
1992, Volume 3 No 11, December
1993, Volume 4 No 5, June
1993, Volume 4 No 7, September
1993, Volume 4 No 8, October
1993, Volume 4 No 10, December
1994, Volume 5 No 1, February
29. Phakamani
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1987 - 1989  
Description
Phakamani, meaning "stand up", reflecting the call to stand up and join the democratic forces inside South Africa and abroad to oppose the legality of the South African Government, was published by the ANC Department of Religious Affairs in Zambia. Phakamani acknowledged the role of religion in the oppression of many South Africans and supported the efforts of theologians struggling to find a meaningful way of expressing their faith in the struggle for a non-racial, non-sexist and democratic South Africa.
Relation
1987 Volume 1 Number 1
1987 Volume 1 Number 2
1988 Volume 2 Number 1
1988 Volume 2 Number 2
1989 Volume 3 Number 1
1989 Volume 3 Number 2
30. Phambili
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1988 - 1989  
Description
Phambili, published by the Phambili Collective in Johannesburg, was a short lived publication comprising 3 issues published during 1988 and 1989. The aim of the publication was to stimulate debate and discussion by raising issues facing the democratic movement, thereby increasing the level of political education. Phambili was not designed for mass distribution but questions were posed at the end of articles to stimulate debate at a mass level. Organisations were encouraged to translate and simplify articles for this purpose.
Relation
1988 April Number 1
1988 October Number 2
1989 November Number 3
31. Pro Veritate
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1962 - 1977  
Description
Pro Veritate, a Christian monthly journal, reflects a theological point of view towards the ideologies of the ruling National Party. Christian viewpoints on such issues as conscientious objection, equality of economic opportunity, education for social change, instruments of power and discriminatory legislation are discussed in order to raise Christian consciousness and awareness to effect peaceful social change in those forces and structures causing deprivation, suffering and other forms of social injustice. The moral conscience of the South African population is called to examine the conflict between what is taught in the Christian Gospel and the injustices and discriminations experienced on a daily basis by the majority of that population: to reject racism in every form as being morally unacceptable and consequently to bring pressure on the National Government to effect political and legislative change to afford equal human rights and opportunities to all in a united South Africa. Several editions of Pro Veritate were declared undesirable under the Publications Act of the day. It was finally banned on 19th October 1977 under the Internal Security Act of South Africa.
Relation
1962, Volume 1 No 1, May
1962, Volume 1 No 2, June
1962, Volume 1 No 3, July
1962, Volume 1 No 4, August
1962, Volume 1 No 5, September
1962, Volume 1 No 6, October
1962, Volume 1 No 7, November
1962, Volume 1 No 8, December
1963 Volume 1 No 9, January
1963 Volume 1 No 10, February
1963 Volume 1 No 11, March
1963, Volume 1 No 12, April
1963, Volume 2 No 1, May
1963, Volume 2 No 2, June
1963, Volume 2 No 3, July
1963, Volume 2 No 4, August
1963, Volume 2 No 5, September
1963, Volume 2 No 6, October
1963, Volume 2 No 7, November
1963, Volume 2 No 8, December
1964, Volume 2 No 9, January
1964, Volume 2 No 10, February
1964, Volume 2 No 11, March
1964, Volume 2 No 12, April
1964, Volume 3 No 1, May
1964, Volume 3 No 2, June
1964, Volume 3 No 3, July
1964, Volume 3 No 4, August
1964, Volume 3 No 5, September
1964, Volume 3 No 6, October
1964, Volume 3 No 7, November
1964, Volume 3 No 8, December
1965, Volume 3 No 9, January
1965, Volume 3 No 10, February
1965, Volume 3 No 11, March
1965, Volume 3 No 12, April
1965, Volume 4 No 1, May
1965, Volume 4 No 2, June
1965, Volume 4 No 3, July
1965, Volume 4 No 4, August
1965, Volume 4 No 5, September
1965, Volume 4 No 6, October
1965, Volume 4 No 7, November
1965, Volume 4 No 8, December
1966, Volume 4 No 9, January
1966 February Number 28
1966, Volume 4 No 11, March
1966, Volume 4 No 12, April
1966, Volume 5 No 1, May
1966, Volume 5 No 2, June
1966, Volume 5 No 3, July
1966, Volume 5 No 4, August
1966, Volume 5 No 5, September
1966, Volume 5 No 6, October
1966, Volume 5 No 7, November
1966, Volume 5 No 8, December
1967, Volume 5 No 9, January
1967, Volume 5 No 10, February
1967, Volume 5 No 11, March
1967, Volume 5 No 12, April
1967, Volume 6 No 1, May
1967, Volume 6 No 2, June
1967, Volume 6 No 3, July
1967, Volume 6 No 4, August
1967, Volume 6 No 5, September
1967, Volume 6 No 6, October
1967, Volume 6 No 7, November
1967, Volume 6 No 8, December
1968, Volume 6 No 9, January
1968, Volume 6 No 10, February
1968, Volume 6 No 11, March
1968, Volume 6 No 12, April
1968, Volume 7 No 1, May
1968, Volume 7 No 2, June
1968, Volume 7 No 3, July
1968, Volume 7 No 4, August
1968, Volume 7 No 5, September
1968, Volume 7 No 6, October
1968, Volume 7 No 7, November
1968, Volume 7 No 8, December
1969, Volume 7 No 9, January
1969, Volume 7 No 10, February
1969, Volume 7 No 11, March
1969, Volume 7 No 12, April
1969, Volume 8 No 1, May
1969, Volume 8 No 2, June
1969, Volume 8 No 3, July
1969, Volume 8 No 4, August
1969, Volume 8 No 5, September
1969, Volume 8 No 6, October
1969, Volume 8 No 7, November
1969, Volume 8 No 8, December
1970, Volume 8 No 9, January
1970, Volume 8 No 10, February
1970, Volume 8 No 11, March
1970, Volume 8 No 12, April
1970, Volume 9 No 1, May
1970, Volume 9 No 2, June
1970, Volume 9 No 3, July
1970, Volume 9 No 4, August
1970, Volume 9 No 5, September
1970, Volume 9 No 6, October
1970, Volume 9 No 7 November
1970, Volume 9 No 8, December
1971, Volume 9 No 9, January
1971, Volume 9 No 10, February
1971, Volume 9 No 11, March
1971, Volume 9 No 12, April
1971, Volume 10 No 1, May
1971, Volume 10 No 2, June
1971, Volume 10 No 3, July
1971, Volume 10 No 4, August
1971, Volume 10 No 5, September
1971, Volume 10 No 6, October
1971, Volume 10 No 7, November
1971, Volume 10 No 8, December
1972, Volume 10 No 9, January
1972, Volume 10 No 10, February
1972, Volume 10 No 11, March
1972, Volume 10 No 12, April
1972, Volume 11 No 1, May
1972, Volume 11 No 2, June
1972, Volume 11 No 3, July
1972, Volume 11 No 4, August
1972, Volume 11 No 5, September
1972, Volume 11 No 6, October
1972, Volume 11 No 7, November
1972, Volume 11 No 8, December
1973, Volume 11 No 9, January
1973, Volume 11 No 10, February
1973, Volume 11 No 11, March
1973, Volume 11 No 12, April
1973, Volume 12 No 1, May
1973, Volume 12 No 2, June
1973, Volume 12 No 3, July
1973, Volume 12 No 4, August
1973, Volume 12 No 5, September
1973, Volume 12 No 6, October
1973, Volume 12 No 7, November
1973, Volume 12 No 8, December
1974, Volume 12 No 9, January
1974, Volume 12 No 10, February
1974, Volume 12 No 11, March
1974, Volume 12 No 12, April
1974, Volume 13 No 1, May
1974, Volume 13 No 2, June
1974, Volume 13 No 3, July
1974, Volume 13 No 4, August
1974, Volume 13 No 5, September
1974, Volume 13 No 6, October
1974, Volume 13 No 7, November
1974, Volume 13 No 8, December
1975, Volume 13 No 9, January
1975, Volume 13 No 10, February
1975, Volume 13 No 11, March
1975, Volume 13 No 12, April
1975, Volume 14 No 1, May
1975, Volume 14 No 2, June
1975, Volume 14 No 3, July
1975, Volume 14 No 4, August
1975, Volume 14 No 5, September
1975, Volume 14 No 6, October
1975, Volume 14 No 7, November
1975, Volume 14 No 8, December
1976, Volume 14 No 8, January
1976, Volume 14 No 9, February
1976, Volume 14 No 10, March
1976, Volume 14 No 11, April
1976, Volume 14 No 12, May
1976, Volume 15 No 1, June
1976, Volume 15 No 2, July
1976, Volume 15 No 3, August
1976, Volume 15 No 4, September
1976, Volume 15 No 5, October
1976, Volume 15 No 6, November
1976, Volume 15 No 7, December
1977, Volume 15 No 9, January
1977, Volume 15 No 10, February
1977, Volume 15 No 11, March
1977, Volume 15 No 12, April
1977, Volume 16 No 1, May
1977, Volume 16 No 2, June
1977, Volume 16 No 3, July
1977, Volume 16 No 4, August
1977, Volume 16 No 5, September
32. Rixaka
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1985 - 1990  
Description
Rixaka, the cultural journal of the African National Congress, was launched to establish a platform allowing full expression of the cultural voice in the national liberation movement. All forms of cultural and artistic expression, such as performing arts, visual arts, film, poetry, literature, were explored as means by which the spirit of revolt among the broad masses could enhance the striking power of the resistance movement and inspire the masses to fight for a liberated country. President of the African National Congress, OR Tambo, in 1984, charged "our cultural workers with the task of using their craft to give voice, not only to the grievances, but also to the profoundest aspirations of the oppressed and exploited"
Relation
1985 Number 1
1986 Number 2
1986 Number 3
1988 Number 4
1990 Number 1
33. SASPU Focus
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1982 - 1986  
Description
SASPU Focus was a feature-orientated publication aimed largely at raising student awareness: at its annual congress during December 1981 NUSAS adopted the theme 'Campus Action for Democracy' for 1982. This slogan called on students to understand, and act on, their university and their education. SASPU Focus attempted to cover educational issues and to encourage debate, in the hope of providing students with a deeper understanding of their immediate environment - the university. In so doing, SASPU Focus propagated the belief that students should play a role in the broader society.
Relation
1982 March Volume 1 Number 1
1982 June/July Volume 1 Number 2
1982 December Volume 1 Number 3
1983 June Volume 2 Number 1
1983 July Volume 2 Number 2
1984 February Volume 3 Number 1
1984 November Volume 3 Number 2
1986 May Volume 5 Number 1
34. Speak - the voice of the community
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1982 - 1986  
Description
Speak: the voice of the community, published by the Speak Community Newspaper Project, reflected the Transvaal communities' struggle against relocations, shack demolitions and evictions. The newspaper reported on the communities' sustained efforts in creating residents' associations, including women's associations, to lobby for better housing, affordable rents and better service provision. United community action against the Government elections resulting in mass meetings to reject the proposed Government constitution was documented in detail.
Relation
1982 August Volume 1 No 1
1982 November Volume 1 No 2
1983 March Volume 1 No 3
1983 June Volume 1 No 4
1983 September Volume 1 No 5
1984 January Volume 2 No 1
1984 April Volume 2 Number 2
1984 July Volume 2 Number 3
1984 November Volume 2 Number 4
1985 March Volume 3 Number 1
1985 June Volume 3 Number 2
1985 November Volume 3 Number 3
1986 April
35. TRAC (Transvaal Rural Action Committee) Newsletter, 1983 - 1990
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1983 - 1990  
Description
TRAC, the Rural Action Committee, established in 1983 as a project of the Black Sash, published this Newsletter with the intention of giving communities under threat of forced removal in the Transvaal province access to information about other communities in similar situations, as well as creating public awareness of the plight of these rural communities. In monitoring forced removals TRAC attempted to assist those threatened with removal as well as those already "persuaded" to move and living in conditions giving rise to unemployment, poverty, disease and malnutrition. The Government policy of forcibly removing "black spots" into newly formed homelands or bantustans was made relatively easy by the existing legislation.
Relation
1983, No 1, May
1984, No 2
1984, No 4, August
1984, No 5, October
1985, No 6, April
1985, No 7, April/May
1985, No 8, August
1985, No 9, September
1986, No 10, April
1985, No 11, July
1987, No 12, February
1987, No 13, August
1988, No 14, February
1990, No 15, September
1990, No 16, October
1991, No 17, February
1991, No 18, March
1991, No 19, November
1991, No 20, December
1992, No 21, April
1992, No 22, May
1992, No 23, August
1992, No 24, December
1993, No 25, March
1993, No 26, November
1993, No 27, December
1994, No 28, July
1994, No 29, November
36. Work In Progress
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1977 - 1994  
Description
The context in which the first issue of Work In Progress appeared was one in which the embryonic trade union movement had not yet emerged as a major actor on the scene. In September 1977 popular political resistance to apartheid seemed to be waning, although the impetus that 16 June 1976 had given to the African National Congress was soon to manifest itself in the 'armed propaganda' associated with guerilla and sabotage activities of the late 1970s and early 1980s. The impetus for the publication came from a group of University of Witwatersrand post-graduate students who believed that modes of analysis and information contained within the university community had to be shared with a wider audience. South Africa was an increasingly complex society, and new developments and dynamics demanded informed debate, analysis and response. While explicitly intellectual in approach, WIP did not set out to be academic, or 'university-based'. It aimed at 'stimulating and provoking responses in a national debate on contemporary South Africa'. When WIP first appeared the labour movement was splintered, small, and struggling to establish itself. Yet from an early stage, WIP raised the questions of class leadership, reflecting its consistent and coherent concern with the class nature of organisations and issues. The earlier issues of WIP tended to raise organisational questions as issues in themselves, relecting the low level of organisational development of the time. From the beginning of 1983, however, as political and community organisations began developing, the issues became more focused and grounded in practical issues. At the beginning of 1985, WIP became one of the first South African-based publications to present current ANC views and developments. These articles were explicitly not propagandist in nature, but represented an attempt to provide information and perspective on an important organisational influence in South African politics of which South Africans were kept ignorant because of censorship, security legislation, curbs on the media and the like. WIP consistently refused to ignore political tendencies and organisations weaker or less well-supported than organisations which occupied centre stage. This reflected a commitment to democracy, open debate and freedom of speech as important cornerstones of progressive politics. WIP's consistency in raising issues about the centralisation and changing nature of state power, changing relationships between and within classes, the impact of monopoly economic dominance on the state, and the relationship between the working class and national-democratic struggle, was a major contribution in establishing what was happening in the changing relations between capital and the state and how to understand a period of 'change' after years of apparent immobility by the ruling National Party. While WIP was by no means the only publication to encourage these debates, its openness to the elaboration of positions which members of the editorial collective did not necessarily agree with was one hall-mark of the publication. Apart from successfully challenging a number of bannings, it was able to make limited inroads into Publications Act committees declaring material undesirable for obviously trivial or untenable reasons. Despite restrictions on what it could publish, WIP's concern with progressive politics and trade unionism, strategies for change, and the organisational and class actors who promoted or impeded the transformation of apartheid society remained constant; it serves as an outstanding example of the necessity for an independent and vibrant press, free of constraints, for the maintenance of a democratic society. A supplement entitled Reconstruct was published with Work in Progress with effect from the January/February 1992 issue and New Era was incorporated with effect from July/August 1992. In July 1994 Work in Progress was incorporated into Southern Africa Report.
Relation
1977, Issue 1 September
1977, Issue 2 November
1978, Issue 3 January
1978, Issue 4 April
1978, Issue 5 June
1978, Issue 6 November
1979, Issue 7 March
1979, Issue 8 May
1979, Issue 9 August
1979, Issue 10 November
1980, Issue 11 February
1980, Issue 12 April
1980, Issue 13 July
1980, Issue 14 September
1980, Issue 15 October
1981, Issue 16 February
1981, Issue 17 April
1981, Issue 18 June
1981, Issue 19 August
1981, Issue 20 October
1982, Issue 21 February
1982, Issue 22 April
1982, Issue 23 June
1982, Issue 24 October
1983, Issue 25 February
1983, Issue 26 April
1983, Issue 27 June
1983, Issue 28 August
1983, Issue 29 October
1984, Issue 30 February
1984, Issue 31 May
1984, Issue 32 July
1984, Issue 33 September
1984, Issue 34 October
1985, Issue 35 February
1985, Issue 36 April
1985, Issue 37 June
1985, Issue 38 August
1985, Issue 39 October
1986, Issue 40 February
1986, Issue 41 April
1986, Issue 42 May
1986, Issue 43 August
1986, Issue 44 September/October
1986, Issue 45 November/December
1987, Issue 46 February
1987, Issue 47 April
1987, Issue 48 July
1987, Issue 49 September
1987, Issue 50/51 October/November
1988, Issue 52 March
1988, Issue 53 April/May
1988, Issue 54 June/July
1988, Issue 55 August/September
1988, Issue 56/57 November/December
1989, Issue 58 March/April
1989, Issue 59 June/July
1989, Issue 60 August/September
1989, Issue 61 September/October
1989, No 62/63 November/December
1990, Issue 64 January
1990, Issue 65 April
1990, Issue 66 May
1990, Issue 67 June
1990, Issue 68 August
1990, Issue 69 September
1990, Issue 70/71 November/December
1991, Issue 72 January/February
1991, Issue 73 March/April
1991, Issue 74 May
1991, Issue 75 June
1991, Issue 76 July
1991, Issue 77 September
1991, Issue 78 October/November
1991, Issue 79 December
1992, Issue 80 January/February
1992, Issue 81 April
1992, Issue 82 June
1992, Issue 83 July/August
1992, Issue 84 September
1992, Issue 85 October
1992, Issue 86 December
1993, Issue 87 February
1993, Issue 88 April/May
1993, Issue 89 June
1993, Issue 90 July
1993, Issue 91 August/September
1993, Issue 92 September/October
1993, Issue 93 November
1993, Issue 94 December
1994, Issue 95 February
1994, Issue 96 April/May
37. Afra Newsletter
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1980-1994  
Description
Afra Newsletter, Report and Factsheet, all published by the Association for Rural Advancement, present case studies of families personally affected by the forced removals and "black spot" removal policy of the National Government. Statistics are given for the number of evictions and threatened evictions in the affected areas mainly in the Natal provincial region (as it was known then). These figures include farm workers and labour tenants who were forcibly removed from white-owned farms with the support of Government legislation. Afra Newsletter is preceded by Afra Report and Afra Factsheet.
Relation
1980 Afra Factsheet
1980 Number 2 July Afra Factsheet
1980 Number 3 July Afra Factsheet
1980 Number 4 October Afra Report
1980 Number 5 October Afra Report
1980 Number 6 October Afra Report
1980 Number 7 December Afra Report
1981 Number 8 March Afra Report
1981 Number 9 March Afra Report
1981 Number 10 April Afra Report
1981 Number 11 August Afra Report
1981 Number 12 September Afra Report
1981 Number 13 September Afra Report
1981 Number 14 November Afra Report
1982 Number 15 April Afra Report
1982 Number 16 April Afra Report
1982 Number 17 June Afra Report
1982 Number 18 October Afra Report
1983 Number 19 February Afra Report
1983 Number 20 May Afra Report
1983 Number 21 July Afra Report
1983 Number 22 August Afra Report
1983 Number 23 November Afra Report
1984 Number 24 April Afra Report
1985 Number 25 Afra Report
1985 Number 26 Afra Report
1986 Number 27 January Afra Report
1986 Number 28 January Afra Report
1987 Number 29 February Afra Report

1988 Number 1 Afra Newsletter
1988 Number 2 Afra Newsletter
1988 Number 3 Afra Newsletter
1990 Number 4 February Afra Newsletter
1990 Number 5 March Afra Newsletter
1990 Number 6 March Afra Newsletter
1990 Number 7 June Afra Newsletter
1990 Number 8 December Afra Newsletter
1991 Number 9 February Afra Newsletter
1991 Number 10 February Afra Newsletter
1991 Number 11 April Afra Newsletter
1991 Number 12 June Afra Newsletter
1991 Number 13 November Afra Newsletter
1991 Number 14 December Afra Newsletter
1992 Number 15 May Afra Newsletter
1992 Number 16 July Afra Newsletter
1992 Number 17 September Afra Newsletter
1992 Number 18 October Afra Newsletter
1992 Number 19 November/December Afra Newsletter
1993 Number 20 February Afra Newsletter
1993 Number 21 April Afra Newsletter
1993 Number 22 June Afra Newsletter
1993 Number 23 August/September Afra Newsletter
1993 Number 24 October/November Afra Newsletter
1993 Number 25 December Afra Newsletter
1994 Number 26 January/February Afra Newsletter
1994 Number 27 April/May Afra Newsletter
1994 Number 28 June/July Afra Newsletter
1994 Number 29 August/September Afra Newsletter
1994 Number 30/31 October/November/December Afra Newsletter
38. Africa South
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1956-1961  
Description
Africa South, a journal edited by Ronald M. Segal (1932-2008) was launched in Cape Town in 1956. The journal was published quarterly while funds were available. The last and final publication was issued in 1961. Ronald M. Segal claimed to be a socialist, and was an anti-apartheid activist who crossed the South African border into exile in 1960 with the African National Congress leader, Oliver Tambo. Views and opinions were expressed in Africa South regarding the movements for freedom, discrimination and the struggle for liberation. The articles were related on issues of interest to the masses, the liberals, the communists and the socialists. Subjects covered issues around the church and the state; the political situation in South-West Africa; Central Africa to North Africa, discussions around their revolution and independence and occasionally covered current events in countries outside of Africa. Africa South also featured short-stories by some well-known authors such as Alan Paton; adding some light-heartedness to politics were the cartoons by various artists such as David Marais; and included book reviews. Various events such as the bus boycotts, political trials and the Sharpeville uprising were featured.
Relation
1956 Vol.1 No.1 Oct-Dec
1957 Vol.1 No.2 Jan-Mar
1957 Vol.1 No.3 Apr-Jun
1957 Vol.1 No.4 Jul-Sept
1957 Vol.2 No.1 0ct-Dec
1958 Vol.2 No.2 Jan-Mar
1958 Vol.2 No.3 Apr-Jun
1958 Vol.2 No.4 Jul-Sept
1958 Vol.3 No.1 Oct-Dec
1959 Vol.3 No.2 Jan-Mar
1959 Vol.3 No.3 Apr-Jun
1959 Vol.3 No.4 Jul-Sept
1959 Vol.4 No.1 Oct-Dec
1960 Vol.4 No.2 Jan-Mar
1960 Vol.4 No.3 Apr-Jun
1960 Vol.4 No.4 Jul-Sept
1960 Vol.5 No.1 Oct-Dec
1961 Vol.5 No.2 Jan-Mar
1961 Vol.5 No.3 Apr-Jun
1961 Vol.5 No.4 Jul-Sept
1961 Vol.6 No.1 Oct-Dec
39. Democracy in Action
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1987-1994  
Description
Democracy in action, published by the Institute for a Democratic Alternative for South Africa (IDASA), outlines the extensive efforts of the Institute to create a climate of open communication and understanding between diverse and often politically opposing groups in order to break down barriers, encourage dialogue and bring about meaningful change in South Africa. It also documents the Institute's efforts to further their aims on the international front by sending delegations abroad, often as invited guests, to promote understanding and support for a democratic alternative for South Africa. Youth workshops, women's seminars, educational and political conferences were platforms for discussions, debates and decisions about democratic issues whilst promoting understanding, tolerance and integration of different race groups with diverse political, cultural and social backgrounds.
Relation
1987 August
1987 October
1987 December
1988 February
1988 April/May
1988 August
1988 October
1988 December
1989 February
1989 March
1989 April
1989 May
1989 June
1989 July
1989 August
1989 September
1989 October
1989 December
1990 February
1990 March
1990 April
1990 May
1990 June/July
1990 July/August
1990 August/September
1990 September/October
1990 October/November
1990 December
1991 February/March
1991 April/May
1991 July/August
1991 December
1992 April
1992 June
1992 July
1992 September Volume 6 Number 5
1992 October Volume 6 Number 6
1992 December Volume 6 Number 7
1993 February Volume 7 Number 1
1993 April Volume 7 Number 2
1993 May Volume 7 Number 3
1993 July Volume 7 Number 4
1993 August Volume 7 Number 5
1993 October Volume 7 Number 6
1993 December Volume 7 Number 7
1994 February Volume 8 Number 1
1994 April Volume 8 Number 2
1994 May Volume 8 Number 3
1994 July Volume 8 Number 4
1994 August Volume 8 Number 5
1994 October Volume 8 Number 6
1994 December Volume 8 Number 7
40. Descom Bulletin
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1982-1986  
Description
In 1982, Neil Aggett, a Trade Unionist and Medical Doctor became the first white political prisoner to die in the detention under the custody of the security police. It was after his death that with the increase of political prisoners that David Webster (Social Anthropology Lecturer at Wits University) amongst others was responsible for organizing the Detainees Parents Support Committee (DPSC) and Detainees Support Committee (Descom). These organizations tried to support those that were detained without trial by the government. Due to the conditions under which the detainees were held in prison, the Detainees Support Committee demanded that they have access to doctors of their own choice or of their own family's choice. The Johannesburg committee set up an independent panel of doctors and requested that they be allowed to see detainees. This request was turned down by the State.
Relation
No.1
No.2
1983 No.3 March
1983 No.4 July
1983 No.5 December
No.6
1984 No.7 October
1985 No.8 May
1985 No.9 November
1986 No.11 July
No.14
41. Fighting Talk
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1950-1963  
Description
Fighting Talk was initially a publication of the Springbok Legion of ex-servicemen and women, until in February 1954 when the "Fighting Talk Committee", in Johannesburg, took over the responsibility for publishing. Appearing monthly, the periodical was edited over a period of several years in the mid-1950's by Ruth First. The focus of the content was largely on resistance by South Africans to the suppressive actions and legislation which the National Government steadily introduced prior to the formation of a Republic in 1961 and immediately thereafter. Extensive coverage is also given to the path of emancipation taken by several African countries, such as Sudan, the Congo, Tanganyika, Nigeria, Guinea and Algeria in their quest for independence from western control. Publication of Fighting Talk ceased in February 1963.
Relation
1950, Volume 8 No 1, January
1950, Volume 8 No 2, February
1950, Volume 8 No 3, March
1950, Volume 8 No 8, August
1950, Volume 8 No 10, October
1950, Volume 8 No 12, December
1951, Volume 9 No 1, January
1951, Volume 9 No 2, February
1951, Volume 9 No 3, March
1951, Volume 9 No 4, April
1951, Volume 9 No 5, May
1951, Volume 9 No 6, June
1951, Volume 9 No 7, July
1951, Volume 9 No 8, August
1951, Volume 9 No 9, September
1951, Volume 9 No 10, October
1951, Volume 9 No 11, November
1951, Volume 9 No 12, December
1952, Volume 10 No 1, January
1952, Volume 10 No 2, February
1952, Volume 10 No 3, March
1952, Volume 10 No 4, April
1952, Volume 10 No 5, May
1952, Volume 10 No 6, June
1952, Volume 10 No 7, July
1952, Volume 10 No 8, August
1952, Volume 10 No 9, September
1952, Volume 10 No 10, October
1952, Volume 10 No 11, November
1952, Volume 10 No 12, December
1953, Volume 11 No 1, January
1953, Volume 11 No 2, February
1953, Volume 11 No 3, March
1953, Volume 11 No 4, April
1953, Volume 11 No 5, May
1953, Volume 11 No 6, June
1953, Volume 11 No 7, July
1953, Volume 11 No 8, August
1953, Volume 11 No 9, September
1953, Volume 11 No 10, November
1954, Volume 10 No 1, January
1954, Volume 10 No 2, February
1954, Volume 10 No 3, March
1954, Volume 10 No 3, April
1954, Volume 10 No 4, May
1954, Volume 10 No 5, June
1954, Volume 10 No 6, July
1954, Volume 10 No 7, August
1954, Volume 10 No 8, September
1954, Volume 10 No 9, October
1954, Volume 10 No 10, November
1955, Volume 11 No 1, March
1955, Volume 11 No 2, April
1955, Volume 11 No 3, May
1955, Volume 11 No 4, June
1955, Volume 11 No 5, July
1955, Volume 11 No 6, August
1955, Volume 11 No 7, September
1955, Volume 11 No 9, October
1955, Volume 11 No 10, November
1955, Volume 11 No 11, November
1956, Volume 12 No 1, January
1956, Volume 12 No 2, February
1956, Volume 12 No 3, March
1956, Volume 12 No 4, April
1956, Volume 12 No 5, May
1956, Volume 12 No 6, June
1956, Volume 12 No 7, July
1956, Volume 12 No 8, August
1956, Volume 12 No 9, September
1956, Volume 12 No 10, October
1956, Volume 12 No 11, November
1956/1957, Volume 10 No 11, December/January
1957, Volume 10 No 12, February
1957, Volume 11 No 3, March
1957, Volume 11 No 4, May
1957, Volume 11 No 5, June
1957, Volume 11 No 6, July
1957, Volume 11 No 7, August
1957, Volume 11 No 8, September
1957, Volume 11 No 9, November
1957/1958, Volume 11 No 10, December/January
1958, Volume 12 No 1, February
1958, Volume 12 No 2, March
1958, Volume 12 No 3, May
1958, Volume 12 No 4, June/July
1958, Volume 12 No 5, August
1958, Volume 12 No 6, September
1958, Volume 12 No 7, November
1958, Volume 12 No 8, December
1959, Volume 13 No 1, February
1959, Volume 13 No 2, March
1959, Volume 13 No 3, April
1959, Volume 13 No 4, May
1959, Volume 13 No 5, July
1959, Volume 13 No 6, August
1959, Volume 13 No 7, September
1959, Volume 13 No 8, October
1959, Volume 13 No 9, December
1960, Volume 14 No 1, February
1960, Volume 14 No 2, March
1960, Volume 14 No 3, 5 August
1960, Volume 14 No 4, 23 August
1960, Volume 14 No 5, October
1960, Volume 14 No 6, November
1960, Volume 14 No 7, December
1961, Volume 15 No 1, February
1961, Volume 15 No 2, March
1961, Volume 15 No 3, April
1961, Volume 15 No 4, May
1961, Volume 15 No 5, June
1961, Volume 15 No 6, July
1961, Volume 15 No 7, August
1961, Volume 15 No 8, September
1961, Volume 15 No 9, October
1961, Volume 15 No 10, November
1961, Volume 15 No 11, December/January
1962, Volume 16 No 1, February
1962, Volume 16 No 2, March
1962, Volume 16 No 3, April
1962, Volume 16 No 4, May
1962, Volume 16 No 5, June
1962, Volume 16 No 6, July
1962, Special issue, August
1962, Volume 16 No 7, September
1962, Volume 16 No 8, October
1962, Volume 16 No 9, November
1962, Volume 16 No 10, December
1963, Volume 17 No 1, January
1963, Volume 17 No 2, February
42. Indian Opinion
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1950-1961  
Description
Indian Opinion, a weekly newspaper, was first established and produced by Mohandas Gandhi ("Mahatma"), M.H. Nazar and Madanjit Viyavaharik in 1903 in the Natal Province. The newspaper focused on Indian rights, poor living conditions of indentured labourers and racial discrimination. It provided an important historical record of the social and political lives of the Indian community in South Africa and also publicised news of the Indians in the colonies to India. The paper included articles in four different languages: English, Hindi, Gujerati and Tamil. Indian Opinion was published at the printing press at the Phoenix Settlement which was established by Gandhi in 1904. In the 1950s when Manilal Gandhi (Gandhi's son) took over editorship, the newspaper focused more broadly on human rights (not just Indian rights). It was instrumental in the civil rights struggle and became a tool for political activism. Satyagraha, Gandhi's philosophy of nonviolent resistance, was encouraged. In 1957 Indian Opinion became "Opinion" and was edited by Sushila Gandhi (Manilal's wife) after Manilal's death. This was to promote nationhood and represent the "oneness of man". The final issue of this newspaper was produced in August 1961 after 58 years of existence.
Relation
1950 Vol.48 No.1 Jan
1950 Vol.48 No.2 Jan
1950 Vol.48 No.3 Jan
1950 Vol.48 No.4 Jan
1950 Vol.48 No.5 Feb
1950 Vol.48 No.6 Feb
1950 Vol.48 No.7 Feb
1950 Vol.48 No.8 Feb
1950 Vol.48 No.9 Mar
1950 Vol.48 No.10 Mar
1950 Vol.48 No.11 Mar
1950 Vol.48 No.12 Mar
1950 Vol.48 No.13 Mar
1950 Vol.48 No.14 Apr
1950 Vol.48 No.15 Apr
1950 Vol.48 No.16 Apr
1950 Vol.48 No.17 Apr
1950 Vol.48 No.18 May
1950 Vol.48 No.19 May
1950 Vol.48 No.20 May
1950 Vol.48 No.21 May
1950 Vol.48 No.22 Jun
1950 Vol.48 No.23 Jun
1950 Vol.48 No.24 Jun
1950 Vol.48 No.25 Jun
1950 Vol.48 No.26 Jun
1950 Vol.48 No.27 Jul
1950 Vol.48 No.28 Jul
1950 Vol.48 No.29 Jul
1950 Vol.48 No.30 Jul
1950 Vol.48 No.31 Aug
1950 Vol.48 No.32 Aug
1950 Vol.48 No.33 Aug
1950 Vol.48 No.34 Aug
1950 Vol.48 No.35 Sep
1950 Vol.48 No.36 Sep
1950 Vol.48 No.37 Sep
1950 Vol.48 No.38 Sep
1950 Vol.48 No.39 Sep
1950 Vol.48 No.40 Oct
1950 Vol.48 No.41 Oct
1950 Vol.48 No.42 Oct
1950 Vol.48 No.43 Oct
1950 Vol.48 No.44 Nov
1950 Vol.48 No.45 Nov
1950 Vol.48 No.46 Nov
1950 Vol.48 No.47 Dec
1950 Vol.48 No.48 Dec
1950 Vol.48 No.49 Dec
1950 Vol.48 No.50 Dec
1950 Vol.48 No.51 Dec
1951 Vol.49 No.1 Jan
1951 Vol.49 No.2 Jan
1951 Vol.49 No.3 Jan
1951 Vol.49 No.4 Jan
1951 Vol.49 No.5 Feb
1951 Vol.49 No.6 Feb
1951 Vol.49 No.7 Feb
1951 Vol.49 No.8 Feb
1951 Vol.49 No.9 Mar
1951 Vol.49 No.10 Mar
1951 Vol.49 No.11 Mar
1951 Vol.49 No.12 Mar
1951 Vol.49 No.13 Mar
1951 Vol.49 No.14 Apr
1951 Vol.49 No.15 Apr
1951 Vol.49 No.16 Apr
1951 Vol.49 No.17 Apr
1951 Vol.49 No.18 May
1951 Vol.49 No.19 May
1951 Vol.49 No.20 May
1951 Vol.49 No.21 May
1951 Vol.49 No.22 Jun
1951 Vol.49 No.23 Jun
1951 Vol.49 No.24 Jun
1951 Vol.49 No.25 Jun
1951 Vol.49 No.26 Jun
1951 Vol.49 No.27 Jul
1951 Vol.49 No.28 Jul
1951 Vol.49 No.29 Jul
1951 Vol.49 No.30 Jul
1951 Vol.49 No.31 Aug
1951 Vol.49 No.32 Aug
1951 Vol.49 No.33 Aug
1951 Vol.49 No.34 Aug
1951 Vol.49 No.35 Aug
1951 Vol.49 No.36 Sep
1951 Vol.49 No.37 Sep
1951 Vol.49 No.38 Sep
1951 Vol.49 No.39 Nov
1951 Vol.49 No.40 Oct
1951 Vol.49 No.41 Oct
1951 Vol.49 No.42 Oct
1951 Vol.49 No.43 Oct
1951 Vol.49 No.44 Nov
1951 Vol.49 No.45 Nov
1951 Vol.49 No.46 Nov
1951 Vol.49 No.47 Nov
1951 Vol.49 No.48 Dec
1951 Vol.49 No.49 Dec
1951 Vol.49 No.50 Dec
1952 Vol.50 No.1 Jan
1952 Vol.50 No.2 Jan
1952 Vol.50 No.3 Jan
1952 Vol.50 No.4 Feb
1952 Vol.50 No.5 Feb
1952 Vol.50 No.6 Feb
1952 Vol.50 No.7 Feb
1952 Vol.50 No.8 Feb
1952 Vol.50 No.9 Mar
1952 Vol.50 No.10 Mar
1952 Vol.50 No.11 Mar
1952 Vol.50 No.12 Mar
1952 Vol.50 No.13 Apr
1952 Vol.50 No.14 Apr
1952 Vol.50 No.15 Apr
1952 Vol.50 No.16 Apr
1952 Vol.50 No.17 May
1952 Vol.50 No.18 May
1952 Vol.50 No.19 May
1952 Vol.50 No.20 May
1952 Vol.50 No.21 May
1952 Vol.50 No.22 Jun
1952 Vol.50 No.23 Jun
1952 Vol.50 No.24 Jun
1952 Vol.50 No.25 Jun
1952 Vol.50 No.26 Jul
1952 Vol.50 No.27 Jul
1952 Vol.50 No.28 Jun
1952 Vol.50 No.29 Jul
1952 Vol.50 No.30 Aug
1952 Vol.50 No.31 Aug
1952 Vol.50 No.32 Aug
1952 Vol.50 No.34 Aug
1952 Vol.50 No.35 Sep
1952 Vol.50 No.36 Sep
1952 Vol.50 No.37 Sep
1952 Vol.50 No.38 Sep
1952 Vol.50 No.39 Oct
1952 Vol.50 No.40 and No.41 Oct
1952 Vol.50 No.42 Nov
1952 Vol.50 No.43 Nov
1952 Vol.50 No.44 Nov
1952 Vol.50 No.45 Nov
1952 Vol.50 No.46 Dec
1952 Vol.50 No.47 Dec
1952 Vol.50 No.48 Dec
1953 Vol.51 No.1 Jan
1953 Vol.51 No.2 Jan
1953 Vol.51 No.3 Jan
1953 Vol.51 No.4 Jan
1953 Vol.51 No.5 Jan
1953 Vol.51 No.6 Feb
1953 Vol.51 No.7 Feb
1953 Vol.51 No.8 Feb
1953 Vol.51 No.9 Feb
1953 Vol.51 No.10 Mar
1953 Vol.51 No.11 Mar
1953 Vol.51 No.12 Mar
1953 Vol.51 No.13 Mar
1953 Vol.51 No.14 Apr
1953 Vol.51 No.15 Apr
1953 Vol.51 No.16 Apr
1953 Vol.51 No.17 Apr
1953 Vol.51 No.18 May
1953 Vol.51 No.19 May
1953 Vol.51 No.20 May
1953 Vol.51 No.21 May
1953 Vol.51 No.22 May
1953 Vol.51 No.23 Jun
1953 Vol.51 No.24 Jun
1953 Vol.51 No.25 Jun
1953 Vol.51 No.26 Jun
1953 Vol.51 No.27 Jul
1953 Vol.51 No.28 Jul
1953 Vol.51 No.29 Jul
1953 Vol.51 No.30 Jul
1953 Vol.51 No.31 Jul
1953 Vol.51 No.32 Aug
1953 Vol.51 No.33 Aug
1953 Vol.51 No.34 Aug
1953 Vol.51 No.35 Aug
1953 Vol.51 No.36 Sep
1953 Vol.51 No.37 Sep
1953 Vol.51 No.38 Sep
1953 Vol.51 No.39 Sep
1953 Vol.51 No.40 Oct
1953 Vol.51 No.41 Oct
1953 Vol.51 No.42 Oct
1953 Vol.51 No.43 Oct
1953 Vol.51 No.44 and No.45 Nov
1953 Vol.51 No.46 Nov
1953 Vol.51 No.47 Nov
1953 Vol.51 No.48 Dec
1953 Vol.51 No.49 Dec
1953 Vol.51 No.50 Dec
1953 Vol.51 No.51 Dec
1954 Vol.52 No.1 Jan
1954 Vol.52 No.2 Jan
1954 Vol.52 No.3 Jan
1954 Vol.52 No.4 Jan
1954 Vol.52 No.5 Jan
1954 Vol.52 No.6 Feb
1954 Vol.52 No.7 Feb
1954 Vol.52 No.8 Feb
1954 Vol.52 No.9 Feb
1954 Vol.52 No.10 Mar
1954 Vol.52 No.11 Mar
1954 Vol.52 No.12 Mar
1954 Vol.52 No.13 Apr
1954 Vol.52 No.14 Apr
1954 Vol.52 No.15 Apr
1954 Vol.52 No.16 Apr
1954 Vol.52 No.17 Apr
1954 Vol.52 No.22 Jun
1954 Vol.52 No.23 Jun
1954 Vol.52 No.24 Jun
1954 Vol.52 No.25 Jul
1954 Vol.52 No.26 Jul
1954 Vol.52 No.27 Jul
1954 Vol.52 No.28 Jul
1954 Vol.52 No.29 Jul
1954 Vol.52 No.30 Aug
1954 Vol.52 No.31 Aug
1954 Vol.52 No.32 Aug
1954 Vol.52 No.33 Aug
1954 Vol.52 No.34 Sep
1954 Vol.52 No.35 Sep
1954 Vol.52 No.36 Sep
1954 Vol.52 No.37 Sep
1954 Vol.52 No.38 Oct
1954 Vol.52 No.39 Oct
1954 Vol.52 No.40 Oct
1954 Vol.52 No.41 Oct
1954 Vol.52 No.42 Nov
1954 Vol.52 No.43 Nov
1954 Vol.52 No.44 Nov
1954 Vol.52 No.45 Nov
1954 Vol.52 No.46 Dec
1954 Vol.52 No.47 Dec
1954 Vol.52 No.48 Dec
1954 Vol.52 No.49 Dec
1955 Vol.53 No.1 Jan
1955 Vol.53 No.2 Jan
1955 Vol.53 No.3 Jan
1955 Vol.53 No.4 Feb
1955 Vol.53 No.5 Feb
1955 Vol.53 No.6 Feb
1955 Vol.53 No.7 Feb
1955 Vol.53 No.8 Feb
1955 Vol.53 No.10 Mar
1955 Vol.53 No.11 Mar
1955 Vol.53 No.13 Apr
1955 Vol.53 No.14 Apr
1955 Vol.53 No.15 Apr
1955 Vol.53 No.16 Apr
1955 Vol.53 No.17 Apr
1955 Vol.53 No.22 Jun
1955 Vol.53 No.23 Jun
1955 Vol.53 No.24 Jun
1955 Vol.53 No.25 Jun
1955 Vol.53 No.26 Jul
1955 Vol.53 No.27 Jul
1955 Vol.53 No.28 Jul
1955 Vol.53 No.29 Jul
1955 Vol.53 No.30 Jul
1955 Vol.53 No.31 Aug
1955 Vol.53 No.32 Aug
1955 Vol.53 No.33 Aug
1955 Vol.53 No.34 Aug
1955 Vol.53 No.35 Sep
1955 Vol.53 No.36 Sep
1955 Vol.53 No.37 Sep
1955 Vol.53 No.38 Sep
1955 Vol.53 No.39 Oct
1955 Vol.53 No.40 Oct
1955 Vol.53 No.41 Oct
1955 Vol.53 No.42 Oct
1955 Vol.53 No.43 and No.44 Nov
1955 Vol.53 No.45 Nov
1955 Vol.53 No.46 Dec
1955 Vol.53 No.47 Dec
1955 Vol.53 No.48 Dec
1955 Vol.53 No.49 Dec
1956 Vol.54 No.1 Jan
1956 Vol.54 No.2 Jan
1956 Vol.54 No.3 Jan
1956 Vol.54 No.4 Jan
1956 Vol.54 No.5 Feb
1956 Vol.54 No.6 Feb
1956 Vol.54 No.7 Feb
1956 Vol.54 No.8 Feb
1956 Vol.54 No.9 Mar
1956 Vol.54 No.10 Mar
1956 Vol.54 No.11 Mar
1956 Vol.54 No.12 Mar
1956 Vol.54 No.13 Mar
1956 Vol.54 No.14 Apr
1956 Manilal Gandhi Memorial Issue Apr
1956 Vol.54 No.16 May
1956 Vol.54 No.17 May
1956 Vol.54 No.18 May
1956 Vol.54 No.19 May
1956 Vol.54 No.20 Jun
1956 Vol.54 No.21 Jun
1956 Vol.54 No.22 Jun
1956 Vol.54 No.23 Jun
1956 Vol.54 No.24 Jun
1956 Vol.54 No.25 Jul
1956 Vol.54 No.26 Jul
1956 Vol.54 No.27 Jul
1956 Vol.54 No.28 Jul
1956 Vol.54 No.29 Aug
1956 Vol.54 No.30 Aug
1956 Vol.54 No.31 Aug
1956 Vol.54 No.32 Aug
1956 Vol.54 No.33 Aug
1956 Vol.54 No.34 Sep
1956 Vol.54 No.35 Sep
1956 Vol.54 No.36 Sep
1956 Vol.54 No.37 Sep
1956 Vol.54 No.38 Oct
1956 Vol.54 No.39 Oct
1956 Vol.54 No.40 Oct
1956 Vol.54 No.41 Oct
1956 Vol.54 No.42 Nov
1956 Vol.54 No.43 Nov
1956 Vol.54 No.44 Nov
1956 Vol.54 No.45 Nov
1956 Vol.54 No.46 Dec
1956 Vol.54 No.47 Dec
1956 Vol.54 No.48 Dec
1957 Vol.55 No.1 Jan
1957 Vol.55 No.2 Jan
1957 Vol.55 No.3 Jan
1957 Vol.55 No.4 Feb
1957 Vol.55 No.5 Feb
1957 Vol.55 No.6 Feb
1957 Vol.55 No.7 Feb
1957 Vol.55 No.8 Mar
1957 Vol.55 No.9 Mar
1957 Vol.55 No.10 Mar
1957 Vol.55 No.11 Mar
1957 Vol.55 No.12 Mar
1957 Vol.55 No.13 and No.14 Apr
1957 Vol.55 No.15 Apr
1957 Vol.55 No.16 Apr
1957 Vol.55 No.17 May
1957 Vol.55 No.18 May
1957 Vol.55 No.19 May
1957 Vol.55 No.20 May
1957 Vol.55 No.21 May
1957 Vol.55 No.22 Jun
1957 Vol.55 No.23 Jun
1957 Vol.55 No.24 Jun
1957 Vol.55 No.25 Jun
1957 Vol.55 No.26 Jul
1957 Vol.55 No.27 Jul
1957 Vol.55 No.28 Jul
1957 Vol.55 No.29 Jul
1957 Vol.55 No.30 Aug
1957 Vol.55 No.31 Aug
1957 Vol.55 No.32 Aug
1957 Vol.55 No.33 Aug
1957 Vol.55 No.34 Aug
1957 Vol.55 No.35 Sep
1957 Vol.55 No.36 Sep
1957 Vol.55 No.37 Sep
1957 Vol.55 No.38 Sep
1957 Vol.55 No.39 Oct
1957 Vol.55 No.40 Oct
1957 Vol.55 No.41 Oct
1957 Vol.55 No.42 Nov
1957 Vol.55 No.43 Nov
1957 Vol.55 No.44 and No.45 Nov
1957 Vol.55 No.45 Nov
1957 Vol.55 No.46 Nov
1957 Vol.55 No.47 Dec
1957 Vol.55 No.48 Dec
1957 Vol.55 No.49 Dec
1958 Vol.56 No.1 Jan
1958 Vol.56 No.2 Jan
1958 Vol.56 No.3 Jan
1958 Vol.56 No.4 Jan
1958 Vol.56 No.5 Feb
1958 Vol.56 No.6 Feb
1958 Vol.56 No.7 Feb
1958 Vol.56 No.8 Feb
1958 Vol.56 No.9 Mar
1958 Vol.56 No.10 Mar
1958 Vol.56 No.11 Mar
1958 Vol.56 No.12 Mar
1958 Vol.56 No.13 Apr
1958 Vol.56 No.14 Apr
1958 Vol.56 No.15 Apr
1958 Vol.56 No.16 May
1958 Vol.56 No.17 May
1958 Vol.56 No.18 May
1958 Vol.56 No.19 May
1958 Vol.56 No.20 May
1958 Vol.56 No.21 Jan
1958 Vol.56 No.22 Jun
1958 Vol.56 No.23 Jun
1958 Vol.56 No.24 Jun
1958 Vol.56 No.25 Jul
1958 Vol.56 No.26 Jul
1958 Vol.56 No.27 Jul
1958 Vol.56 No.28 Jul
1958 Vol.56 No.29 Aug
1958 Vol.56 No.30 Aug
1958 Vol.56 No.31 Aug
1958 Vol.56 No.32 Aug
1958 Vol.56 No.33 Aug
1958 Vol.56 No.34 Sep
1958 Vol.56 No.35 Sep
1958 Vol.56 No.36 Sep
1958 Vol.56 No.37 Sep
1958 Vol.56 No.38 Oct
1958 Vol.56 No.39 Oct
1958 Vol.56 No.40 Oct
1958 Vol.56 No.41 Oct
1958 Vol.56 No.42 Oct
1958 Vol.56 No.43 Nov
1958 Vol.56 No.44 Nov
1958 Vol.56 No.45 Nov
1958 Vol.56 No.46 Dec
1958 Vol.56 No.47 Dec
1958 Vol.56 No.48 Dec
1959 Vol.57 No.1 Jan
1959 Vol.57 No.2 Jan
1959 Vol.57 No.3 Jan
1959 Vol.57 No.4 Jan
1959 Vol.57 No.5 Feb
1959 Vol.57 No.6 Feb
1959 Vol.57 No.7 Feb
1959 Vol.57 No.8 Feb
1959 Vol.57 No.9 Mar
1959 Vol.57 No.10 Mar
1959 Vol.57 No.11 Mar
1959 Vol.57 No.12 Mar
1959 Vol.57 No.13 Apr
1959 Vol.57 No.14 Apr
1959 Vol.57 No.15 Apr
1959 Vol.57 No.16 Apr
1959 Vol.57 No.17 May
1959 Vol.57 No.18 May
1959 Vol.57 No.19 May
1959 Vol.57 No.20 May
1959 Vol.57 No.21 May
1959 Vol.57 No.22 May
1959 Vol.57 No.23 Jun
1959 Vol.57 No.24 Jun
1959 Vol.57 No.25 Jun
1959 Vol.57 No.26 Jul
1959 Vol.57 No.27 Jul
1959 Vol.57 No.28 Jul
1959 Vol.57 No.29 Jul
1959 Vol.57 No.30 Jul
1959 Vol.57 No.31 Aug
1959 Vol.57 No.32 Aug
1959 Vol.57 No.33 Aug
1959 Vol.57 No.34 Aug
1959 Vol.57 No.35 Sep
1959 Vol.57 No.36 Sep
1959 Vol.57 No.37 Sep
1959 Vol.57 No.38 Sep
1959 Vol.57 No.39 Nov
1959 Vol.57 No.40 Nov
1959 Vol.57 No.41 Nov
1959 Vol.57 No.42 Nov
1959 Vol.57 No.43 Nov
1959 Vol.57 No.44 Nov
1959 Vol.57 No.45 Nov
1959 Vol.57 No.46 Nov
1959 Vol.57 No.47 Dec
1959 Vol.57 No.48 Dec
1959 Vol.57 No.49 Dec
1960 Vol.58 No.1 Jan
1960 Vol.58 No.2 Feb
1960 Vol.58 No.3 Feb
1960 Vol.58 No.4 Feb
1960 Vol.58 No.5 Feb
1960 Vol.58 No.6 Feb
1960 Vol.58 No.7 Feb
1960 Vol.58 No.8 Feb
1960 Vol.58 No.9 Mar
1960 Vol.58 No.10 Mar
1960 Vol.58 No.11 Mar
1960 Vol.58 No.12 Mar
1960 Vol.58 No.13 Apr
1960 Vol.58 No.14 Apr
1960 Vol.58 No.15 Apr
1960 Vol.58 No.16 Apr
1960 Vol.58 No.17 Apr
1960 Vol.58 No.18 May
1960 Vol.58 No.19 May
1960 Vol.58 No.20 May
1960 Vol.58 No.21 May
1960 Vol.58 No.22 Jun
1960 Vol.58 No.23 Jun
1960 Vol.58 No.24 Jun
1960 Vol.58 No.25 Jun
1960 Vol.58 No.26 Jul
1960 Vol.58 No.27 Jul
1960 Vol.58 No.28 Jul
1960 Vol.58 No.29 Jul
1960 Vol.58 No.30 Jul
1960 Vol.58 No.31 Aug
1960 Vol.58 No.32 Aug
1960 Vol.58 No.33 Aug
1960 Vol.58 No.34 Aug
1960 Vol.58 No.35 Sep
1960 Vol.58 No.36 Sep
1960 Vol.58 No.37 Sep
1960 Vol.58 No.39 Sep
1960 Vol.58 No.40 Oct
1960 Vol.58 No.41 Oct
1960 Vol.58 No.42 Oct
1960 Vol.58 No.43 Nov
1960 Vol.58 No.44 Nov
1960 Vol.58 No.45 Nov
1960 Vol.58 No.46 Nov
1960 Vol.58 No.47 Dec
1960 Vol.58 No.48 Dec
1960 Vol.58 No.49 Dec
1961 Vol.58 No.1 Jan
1961 Vol.58 No.2 Jan
1961 Vol.58 No.3 Jan
1961 Vol.58 No.4 Feb
1961 Vol.58 No.5 Feb
1961 Vol.58 No.6 Feb
1961 Vol.58 No.7 Feb
1961 Vol.58 No.8 Mar
1961 Vol.58 No.9 Mar
1961 Vol.58 No.10 Mar
1961 Vol.58 No.11 Mar
1961 Vol.58 No.12 Mar
1961 Vol.58 No.13 Apr
1961 Vol.58 No.14 Apr
1961 Vol.58 No.15 Apr
1961 Vol.58 No.16 Apr
1961 Vol.58 No.17 May
1961 Vol.58 No.18 May
1961 Vol.58 No.19 May
1961 Vol.58 No.20 May
1961 Vol.58 No.21 Jun
1961 Vol.58 No.22 Jun
1961 Vol.58 No.23 Jun
1961 Vol.58 No.24 Jun
1961 Vol.58 No.25 Jun
1961 Vol.58 No.26 Jul
1961 Vol.58 No.27 Jul
1961 Vol.58 No.28 Jul
1961 Vol.58 No.29 Jul
1961 Vol.58 No.30 Jul
43. Liberal Opinion/Reality
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1961-1993  
Description
Liberal Opinion (1961-1968) was published by the Liberal Party of South Africa which was established in 1953 by Alan Paton, after the National Government had won its second General Election. The Liberal Party stood firm for a democratic government; human rights; racial discrimination and non-violence for all South African citizens. The Liberal Party was forced to disband under the Prohibition of Political Interference Act of 1968 and this lead to the title change to Reality: a journal of liberal and radical opinion (1969-1993). The journal continued to focus on South African politics, its leaders and the activities of political parties.
Relation
Liberal Opinion Vol.1 No.1 Sep 1961
Liberal Opinion Vol.1 No.2 Dec 1961
Liberal Opinion Vol.1 No.3 Mar 1962
Liberal Opinion Vol.1 No.4 Jul 1962
Liberal Opinion Vol.2 No.1 Oct 1962
Liberal Opinion Vol.2 No.2 Feb 1963
Liberal Opinion Vol.2 No.3 Jun 1963
Liberal Opinion Vol.2 No.4 Sep 1963
Liberal Opinion Vol.3 No.1 Jan 1964
Liberal Opinion Vol.3 No.2 Apr 1964
Liberal Opinion Vol.3 No.3 July 1964
Liberal Opinion Vol.3 No.4 Oct 1964
Liberal Opinion Vol.4 No.1 Jan 1965
Liberal Opinion Vol.4 No.2 May 1965
Liberal Opinion Vol.4 No.3 Aug 1965
Liberal Opinion Vol.4 No.4 Mar 1966
Liberal Opinion Vol.4 No.5 Jun 1966
Liberal Opinion Vol.4 No.6 Sep 1966
Liberal Opinion Vol.4 No.7 Dec 1966
Liberal Opinion Vol.5 No.1 Mar 1967
Liberal Opinion Vol.5 No.2 Jun 1967
Liberal Opinion Vol.5 No.3 Sep-Oct 1967
Liberal Opinion Vol.6 No.1 Jan 1968
Liberal Opinion Vol.6 No.2 Apr 1968
Reality Vol.4 No.1 Mar 1972
Reality Vol.4 No.2 May 1972
Reality Vol.4 No.3 Jul 1972
Reality Vol.4 No.4 Sep 1972
Reality Vol.4 No.5 Nov 1972
Reality Vol.4 No.6 January 1973
Reality Vol.5 No.1 Mar 1973
Reality Vol.5 No.2 May 1973
Reality Vol.5 No.3 Jul 1973
Reality Vol.5 No.4 Sep 1973
Reality Vol.5 No.5 Nov 1973
Reality Vol.5 No.6 Jan 1974
Reality Vol.6 No.1 Mar 1974
Reality Vol.6 No.2 May 1974
Reality Vol.6 No.3 Jul 1974
Reality Vol.6 No.4 Sep 1974
Reality Vol.6 No.5 Nov 1974
Reality Vol.6 No.6 Jan 1975
Reality Vol.7 No.1 Mar 1975
Reality Vol.7 No.2 May 1975
Reality Vol.7 No.3 Jul 1975
Reality Vol.7 No.4 Sep 1975
Reality Vol.7 No.5 Nov 1975
Reality Vol.7 No.6 Jan 1976
Reality Vol.8 No.1 Mar 1976
Reality Vol.8 No.2 May 1976
Reality Vol.8 No.3 Jul 1976
Reality Vol.8 No.4 Sep 1976
Reality Vol.8 No.6 Jan 1977
Reality Vol.9 No.1 Mar 1977
Reality Vol.9 No.2 May 1977
Reality Vol.9 No.3 Jul 1977
Reality Vol.9 No.4 Sep 1977
Reality Vol.9 No.5 Nov 1977
Reality Vol.10 No.1 Jan 1978
Reality Vol.10 No.2 Mar 1978
Reality Vol.10 No.3 May 1978
Reality Vol.10 No.4 Jul 1978
Reality Vol.10 No.6 Nov 1978
Reality Vol.11 No.1 Jan 1979
Reality Vol.11 No.2 Mar 1979
Reality Vol.11 No.3 May 1979
Reality Vol.11 No.4 Jul 1979
Reality Vol.11 No.5 Sep 1979
Reality Vol.11 No.6 Nov 1979
Reality Vol.12 No.1 Jan 1980
Reality Vol.12 No.2 Mar 1980
Reality Vol.12 No.3 May 1980
Reality Vol.12 No.4 Jul 1980
Reality Vol.12 No.5 Sep 1980
Reality Vol.12 No.6 Nov 1980
Reality Vol.13 No.1 Jan 1981
Reality Vol.13 No.2 Mar 1981
Reality Vol.13 No.3 May 1981
Reality Vol.13 No.4 Jul 1981
Reality Vol.13 No.5 Sep 1981
Reality Vol.13 No.6 Nov 1981
Reality Vol.14 No.1 Jan 1982
Reality Vol.14 No.2 Mar 1982
Reality Vol.14 No.3 May 1982
Reality Vol.14 No.4 Jul 1982
Reality Vol.14 No.5 Sep 1982
Reality Vol.14 No.6 Nov 1982
Reality Vol.15 No.1 Jan 1983
Reality Vol.15 No.2 Mar 1983
Reality Vol.15 No.3 May 1983
Reality Vol.15 No.4 Jul 1983
Reality Vol.15 No.5 Aug 1983
Reality Vol.15 No.6 Nov 1983
Reality Vol.16 No.1 Jan 1984
Reality Vol.16 No.2 Mar 1984
Reality Vol.16 No.3 May 1984
Reality Vol.16 No.4 Jul 1984
Reality Vol.16 No.5 Sep 1984
Reality Vol.16 No.6 Nov 1984
Reality Vol.17 No.1 Jan 1985
Reality Vol.17 No.2 Mar 1985
Reality Vol.17 No.3 May 1985
Reality Vol.17 No.4 Jul 1985
Reality Vol.17 No.5 Sep 1985
Reality Vol.17 No.6 Nov 1985
Reality Vol.18 No.1 Jan 1986
Reality Vol.18 No.2 and 3 Mar-May 1986
Reality Vol.18 No.4 Jul 1986
Reality Vol.18 No.5 Sep 1986
Reality Vol.19 No.1 Jan 1987
Reality Vol.19 No.2 Mar 1987
Reality Vol.19 No.3 May 1987
Reality Vol.19 No.4 Jul 1987
Reality Vol.19 No.5 Sep 1987
Reality Vol.19 No.6 Nov 1987
Reality Vol.20 No.1 Jan 1988
Reality Vol.20 No.2 and 3 Mar-May 1988
Reality Vol.20 No.4 Jul 1988
Reality Vol.20 No.5 Sep 1988
Reality Vol.20 No.6 Nov 1988
Reality Vol.21 No.1 Jan 1989
Reality Vol.21 No.3 May 1989
Reality Vol.21 No.4 Jul 1989
Reality Vol.21 No.5 Sep 1989
Reality Vol.21 No.6 Nov 1989
Reality Vol.22 No.1 and 2 Jan-Mar 1990
Reality Vol.22 No.3 May 1990
Reality Vol.22 No.4 Jul 1990
Reality Vol.22 No.5 Sep 1990
Reality Vol.22 No.6 Nov 1990
Reality Vol.23 No.1 and 2 Jan-Mar 1991
Reality Vol.23 No.3 May 1991
Reality Vol.23 No.4 Jul 1991
Reality Vol.23 No.5 Sep 1991
Reality Vol.23 No.6 Oct 1991
Reality Vol.24 No.1 Jan 1992
Reality Vol.24 No.2 Mar-Apr 1992
Reality Vol.24 No.3 May-Jun 1992
Reality Vol.24 No.4 Aug 1992
Reality Vol.24 No.5 Jan 1993
44. New Age
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1954-1963  
Description
New Age, newspaper and its' predecessors, The Guardian; Advance were founded by trade unionists, academics and and was known as a leftist publication. New Age was linked to the African National Congress and its' leadership. In 1954, Govan Mbeki joined the editorial board of New Age, together with Ruth First, Brian and Sonya Bunting and others. The articles and columns in New Age reflected the conditions of the Black people, including Indians and Coloureds of South Africa and showcased the reality of apartheid focusing on the socio-political and economic conditions with some articles covering fiction, poetry and sport. Some items that made "front page" were, the Treason Trial; revolts at Zeerust and Sekhukhuniland; Group Areas and the protests by Indians; Banning of the newspaper and political organisations; coverage of those activists abroad who were exiled; women demonstrating against the pass-laws; workers and their demands for better working conditions and wages. The leaders used their writing skills to document the state of South Africa, it's people, and their sufferings for the common struggle for liberation and freedom.
Relation
1954 Vol.1 No.1 Oct
1954 Vol.1 No.2 Nov
1955 Vol.1 No.12 Jan
1955 Vol.1 No.21 Mar
1955 Vol.1 No.24 Apr
1955 Vol.1 No.25 Apr
1955 Vol.1 No.26 Apr
1955 Vol.1 No.28 May
1955 Vol.1 No.30 May
1955 Vol.1 No.32 Jun
1955 Vol.1 No.34 Jun
1955 Vol.1 No.36 Jun
1955 Vol.1 No.37 Jul
1955 Vol.1 No.39 Jul
1955 Vol.1 No.40 Jul
1955 Vol.1 No.42 Aug
1955 Vol.1 No.43 Aug
1955 Vol.1 No.47 Sep
1955 Vol.1 No.48 Sep
1955 Vol.1 No.51 Oct
1955 Vol.2 No.2 Nov
1955 Vol.2 No.4 Nov
1955 Vol.2 No.5 Nov
1955 Vol.2 No.6 Dec
1955 Vol.2 No.7 Dec
1955 Vol.2 No.8 Dec
1955 Vol.2 No.9 Dec
1956 Vol.2 No.10 Jan
1956 Vol.2 No.11Jan
1956 Vol.2 No.12 Jan
1956 Vol.2 No.13 Jan
1956 Vol.2 No.14 Feb
1956 Vol.2 No.15 Feb
1956 Vol.2 No.18 Mar
1956 Vol.2 No.19 Mar
1956 Vol.2 No.20 Mar
1956 Vol.2 No.21 Mar
1956 Vol.2 No.25 Apr
1956 Vol.2 No.26 Apr
1956 Vol.2 No.27 May
1956 Vol.2 No.28 May
1956 Vol.2 No.29 May
1956 Vol.2 No.31 May
1956 Vol.2 No.32 Jun
1956 Vol.2 No.34 Jun
1956 Vol.2 No.37 Jul
1956 Vol.2 No.38 Jul
1956 Vol.2 No.39 Jul
1956 Vol.2 No.41 Aug
1956 Vol.2 No.42 Aug
1956 Vol.2 No.43 Aug
1956 Vol.2 No.44 Aug
1956 Vol.2 No.45 Sep
1956 Vol.2 No.47 Sep
1956 Vol.2 No.51 Oct
1956 Vol.2 No.52 Oct
1956 Vol.3 No.1 Nov
1956 Vol.3 No.2 Nov
1956 Vol.3 No.4 Nov
1956 Vol.3 No.5 Nov
1956 Vol.3 No.7 Dec
1956 Vol.3 No.8 Dec
1956 Vol.3 No.9 Dec
1957 Vol.3 No.12 Jan
1957 Vol.3 No.15 Jan
1957 Vol.3 No.17 Feb
1957 Vol.3 No.18 Feb
1957 Vol.3 No.20 Mar
1957 Vol.3 No.21 Mar
1957 Vol.3 No.22 Mar
1957 Vol.3 No.23 Mar
1957 Vol.3 No.24 Apr
1957 Vol.3 No.26 Apr
1957 Vol.3 No.27 Apr
1957 Vol.3 No.28 May
1957 Vol.3 No.29 May
1957 Vol.3 No.31 May
1957 Vol.3 No.33 Jun
1957 Vol.3 No.34 Jun
1957 Vol.3 No.36 Jun
1957 Vol.3 No.39 Jul
1957 Vol.3 No.40 Jul
1957 Vol.3 No.41 Aug
1957 Vol.3 No.42 Aug
1957 Vol.3 No.43 Aug
1957 Vol.3 No.44 Aug
1957 Vol.3 No.46 Sep
1957 Vol.3 No.48 Sep
1957 Vol.3 No.49 Sep
1957 Vol.3 No.50 Oct
1957 Vol.3 No.51 Oct
1957 Vol.3 No.52 Oct
1957 Vol.4 No.1 Oct
1957 Vol.4 No.2 Oct
1957 Vol.4 No.3 Nov
1957 Vol.4 No.4 Nov
1957 Vol.4 No.5 Nov
1957 Vol.4 No.6 Nov
1957 Vol.4 No.7 Dec
1957 Vol.4 No.8 Dec
1957 Vol.4 No.9 Dec
1957 Vol.4 No.10 Dec
1958 Vol.4 No.11 Jan
1958 Vol.4 No.13 Jan
1958 Vol.4 No.14 Jan
1958 Vol.4 No.15 Jan
1958 Vol.4 No.16 Feb
1958 Vol.4 No.17 Feb
1958 Vol.4 No.18 Feb
1958 Vol.4 No.19 Feb
1958 Vol.4 No.20 Mar
1958 Vol.4 No.21 Mar
1958 Vol.4 No.22 Mar
1958 Vol.4 No.23 Mar
1958 Vol.4 No.24 Apr
1958 Vol.4 No.25 Apr
1958 Vol.4 No.27 Apr
1958 Vol.4 No.28 May
1958 Vol.4 No.29 May
1958 Vol.4 No.30 May
1958 Vol.4 No.31 May
1958 Vol.4 No.34 Jun
1958 Vol.4 No.35 Jun
1958 Vol.4 No.36 Jun
1958 Vol.4 No.38 Jul
1958 Vol.4 No.40 Jul
1958 Vol.4 No.41 Jul
1958 Vol.4 No.42 Aug
1958 Vol.4 No.43 Aug
1958 Vol.4 No.45 Aug
1958 Vol.4 No.46 Sep
1958 Vol.4 No.47 Sep
1958 Vol.4 No.48 Sep
1958 Vol.4 No.50 Oct
1958 Vol.4 No.51 Oct
1958 Vol.4 No.52 Oct
1958 Vol.5 No.1 Oct
1958 Vol.5 No.2 Oct
1958 Vol.5 No.3 Nov
1958 Vol.5 No.4 Nov
1958 Vol.5 No.5 Nov
1958 Vol.5 No.6 Nov
1958 Vol.5 No.7 Dec
1958 Vol.5 No.8 Dec
1958 Vol.5 No.9 Dec
1958 Vol.5 No.10 Dec
1959 Vol.5 No.11 Jan
1959 Vol.5 No.12 Jan
1959 Vol.5 No.13 Jan
1959 Vol.5 No.14 Jan
1959 Vol.5 No.15 Jan
1959 Vol.5 No.16 Feb
1959 Vol.5 No.17 Feb
1959 Vol.5 No.18 Feb
1959 Vol.5 No.19 Feb
1959 Vol.5 No.20 Mar
1959 Vol.5 No.21 Mar
1959 Vol.5 No.22 Mar
1959 Vol.5 No.23 Mar
1959 Vol.5 No.24 Apr
1959 Vol.5 No.25 Apr
1959 Vol.5 No.26 Apr
1959 Vol.5 No.27 Apr
1959 Vol.5 No.28 Apr
1959 Vol.5 No.29 May
1959 Vol.5 No.32 May
1959 Vol.5 No.34 Jun
1959 Vol.5 No.35 Jun
1959 Vol.5 No.36 Jun
1959 Vol.5 No.39 Jul
1959 Vol.5 No.40 Jul
1959 Vol.5 No.41 Jul
1959 Vol.5 No.42 Aug
1959 Vol.5 No.43 Aug
1959 Vol.5 No.44 Aug
1959 Vol.5 No.45 Aug
1959 Vol.5 No.46 Sep
1959 Vol.5 No.47 Sep
1959 Vol.5 No.48 Sep
1959 Vol.5 No.49 Sep
1959 Vol.5 No.50 Oct
1959 Vol.5 No.51 Oct
1959 Vol.6 No.1 Oct
1959 Vol.6 No.2 Oct
1959 Vol.6 No.3 Nov
1959 Vol.6 No.4 Nov
1959 Vol.6 No.5 Nov
1959 Vol.6 No.6 Nov
1959 Vol.6 No.7 Dec
1959 Vol.6 No.8 Dec
1959 Vol.6 No.9 Dec
1959 Vol.6 No.11 Dec
1960 Vol.6 No.12 Jan
1960 Vol.6 No.13 Jan
1960 Vol.6 No.14 Jan
1960 Vol.6 No.15 Jan
1960 Vol.6 No.16 Feb
1960 Vol.6 No.17 Feb
1960 Vol.6 No.18 Feb
1960 Vol.6 No.19 Feb
1960 Vol.6 No.20 Mar
1960 Vol.6 No.21 Mar
1960 Vol.6 No.22 Mar
1960 Vol.6 No.23 Mar
1960 Vol.6 No.27 Sep
1960 Vol.6 No.28 Sep
1960 Vol.6 No.31 Oct
1960 Vol.6 No.33 Oct
1960 Vol.6 No.34 Nov
1960 Vol.7 No.1 Oct
1960 Vol.7 No.5 Nov
1960 Vol.7 No.6 Nov
1960 Vol.7 No.7 Dec
1960 Vol.7 No.8 Dec
1960 Vol.7 No.9 Dec
1960 Vol.7 No.10 Dec
1961 Vol.7 No.13 Jan
1961 Vol.7 No.14 Jan
1961 Vol.7 No.15 Jan
1961 Vol.7 No.16 Feb
1961 Vol.7 No.17 Feb
1961 Vol.7 No.19 Feb
1961 Vol.7 No.20 Mar
1961 Vol.7 No.21 Mar
1961 Vol.7 No.22 Mar
1961 Vol.7 No.23 Mar
1961 Vol.7 No.24 Mar
1961 Vol.7 No.25 Apr
1961 Vol.7 No.26 Apr
1961 Vol.7 No.27 Apr
1961 Vol.7 No.28 Apr
1961 Vol.7 No.29 May
1961 Vol.7 No.30 May
1961 Vol.7 No.31 May
1961 Vol.7 No.32 May
1961 Vol.7 No.33 Jun
1961 Vol.7 No.34 Jun
1961 Vol.7 No.35 Jun
1961 Vol.7 No.36 Jun
1961 Vol.7 No.37 Jun
1961 Vol.7 No.38 Jul
1961 Vol.7 No.39 Jul
1961 Vol.7 No.40 Jul
1961 Vol.7 No.41 Jul
1961 Vol.7 No.42 Aug
1961 Vol.7 No.43 Aug
1961 Vol.7 No.44 Aug
1961 Vol.7 No.45 Aug
1961 Vol.7 No.46 Aug
1961 Vol.7 No.47 Sep
1961 Vol.7 No.48 Sep
1961 Vol.7 No.49 Sep
1961 Vol.7 No.50 Sep
1961 Vol.7 No.52 Oct
1961 Vol.8 No.1 Oct
1961 Vol.8 No.2 Oct
1961 Vol.8 No.3 Oct
1961 Vol.8 No.4 Nov
1961 Vol.8 No.5 Nov
1961 Vol.8 No.6 Nov
1961 Vol.8 No.7 Nov
1961 Vol.8 No.8 Dec
1961 Vol.8 No.9 Dec
1961 Vol.8 No.10 Dec
1961 Vol.8 No.11 Dec
1962 Vol.8 No.12 Jan
1962 Vol.8 No.13 Jan
1962 Vol.8 No.14 Jan
1962 Vol.8 No.15 Jan
1962 Vol.8 No.16 Feb
1962 Vol.8 No.17 Feb
1962 Vol.8 No.18 Feb
1962 Vol.8 No.19 Feb
1962 Vol.8 No.20 Mar
1962 Vol.8 No.21 Mar
1962 Vol.8 No.22 Mar
1962 Vol.8 No.23 Mar
1962 Vol.8 No.24 Mar
1962 Vol.8 No.25 Apr
1962 Vol.8 No.26 Apr
1962 Vol.8 No.27 Apr
1962 Vol.8 No.28 Apr
1962 Vol.8 No.29 May
1962 Vol.8 No.30 May
1962 Vol.8 No.31 May
1962 Vol.8 No.32 May
1962 Vol.8 No.34 Jun
1962 Vol.8 No.35 Jun
1962 Vol.8 No.36 Jun
1962 Vol.8 No.37 Jun
1962 Vol.8 No.38 Jul
1962 Vol.8 No.39 Jul
1962 Vol.8 No.40 Jul
1962 Vol.8 No.41 Jul
1962 Vol.8 No.42 Aug
1962 Vol.8 No.43 Aug
1962 Vol.8 No.44 Aug
1962 Vol.8 No.45 Aug
1962 Vol.8 No.46 Aug
1962 Vol.8 No.47 Sep
1962 Vol.8 No.48 Sep
1962 Vol.8 No.49 Sep
1962 Vol.8 No.50 Sep
1962 Vol.8 No.51 Oct
1962 Vol.8 No.52 Oct
1962 Vol.9 No.1 Oct
1962 Vol.9 No.2 Oct
1962 Vol.9 No.3 Oct
1962 Vol.9 No.4 Nov
1962 Vol.9 No.5 Nov
1962 Vol.9 No.6 Nov
1962 Vol.9 No.7 Nov
45. NUM News
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1985-1994  
Description
NUM news, published by the National Union of Mineworkers, reflects the mineworkers struggle for liberation from racial discrimination experienced by workers in the mines with regard to work conditions, wages, hostel accommodation, retrenchments and other related issues.
Relation
1985 Volume 1 Number 1 October
1986 October
1987 May
1987 August
1988 December
1989 March
1989 July
1989 December
1990 September
1990 October
1990/1991 December/January
1991 April
1991 June
1992 August/September
1992 September
1992 November
1993 April/May
1993/1994 December/January
46. SASO Newsletter, 1970 - 1976
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1970-1976  
Description
By the late 1960s many black students increasingly began to feel the frustration and disillusionment similar to that which had led to the Fort Hare SRC to disaffiliate from NUSAS in 1952. For some students at the University of Natal Medical School (UNMS) their involvement and experience in NUSAS increasingly suggested that the liberal politics of that union could not serve the immediate or long-term aspirations of black students. Also at issue was the fact that, despite its non-racial membership, NUSAS was essentially dominated and controlled by white students. It was this kind of situation that Biko had in mind when he expressed in his column, "I write what I like", in the SASO Newsletter, his objection to this type of 'intellectual arrogance' by whites. Out of the University Christian Movement (UCM) conference in 1968 came agreement on the need for a new black student organisation and a representative conference of black students. Duly convened in December 1968 this conference gave birth to an exclusively black higher education formation, the South African Students' Organisation (SASO), and the election of Steve Biko as national president on its formal inauguration in July 1969. In analysing South African society, SASO viewed race as the primary line of distinction. Class divisions were not seen as important and there was little recognition of gender issues. The positive doctrine that SASO proclaimed itself to uphold was the concept of Black Consciousness (BC), which was defined as an 'attitude of mind, a way of life': SASO stressed the need for blacks to develop their own value systems, and to define themselves, rather than be defined by others. "Black man you are on your own" was to be adopted by SASO as its rallying cry. Thus the previous negative definition of the self as 'non-white' gave way to positive identification as 'black'. An editorial in the SASO Newsletter of September 1970 stated the political and strategic rationale for the term "black": it was an attempt to "define one's enemy more clearly and broaden the base from which we are operating." A number of criticisms can be levelled against SASO and various weaknesses can be pointed to in its doctrine of BC, its analysis of the South African social formation and its political strategies. However, despite being primarily a student organisation SASO took on the responsibility and rekindled black intellectual and political opposition to white domination. As a catalyst of the conflagration that was the Soweto uprising and in also creating the conditions for the generalisation of political resistance and organisation post-Soweto, SASO ensured that it was of tremendous historical significance in the struggle for national liberation in South Africa.
Relation
1970 August
1970 September
1971 Volume 1 No 1 May
1971 Volume 1 No 2 June
1971 Volume 1 No 3 August
1971 Volume 1 No 4 September
1972 Volume 2 No 1 January/February
1972 Volume 2 No 2 March/April
1972 Volume 2 No 3 May/June
1972 Volume 2 No 4 September/October
1972 Volume 2 No 5 November/December
1973 Volume 3 No 1 March/April
1975 Volume 5 No 1 May/June
1975 Volume 5 No 2 July/August
1975 Volume 5 No 3 November/December
1976 Volume 6 No 1 March/April
47. SASPU National, 1980 - 1987
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1980 - 1987  
Description
SASPU National was one of two publications produced by the South African Students Press Union (SASPU), the other being SASPU Focus. A non-profit newspaper, about 25 000 copies of SASPU National were distributed mostly through organisations. The National Union of South African Students (NUSAS) was founded in 1924 at Grey College, Bloemfontein. It began as an apolitical organisation, which aimed to further national cooperation between students, and cooperation with student leaders in other countries. In 1933 Afrikaans students broke away after a debate about the affiliation to NUSAS of the first black campus, Fort Hare. After the war NUSAS remained apolitical, believing it should only oppose discrimination in education. The mass militancy of the 1950s influenced the union in the latter half of the decade and NUSAS linked itself closely with the South African Liberal Party. During the 1980s NUSAS participated in the democratic movement in various ways: extending its role through participation in national poliitcal campaigns like the 'Free Mandela Campaign', and through support of consumer boycotts. Participation in the United Democratic Front (UDF) in particular had consolidated NUSAS' political role. NUSAS together with the Azanian Students Organisation (AZASO) and the Congress of South African Students (COSAS) formed the student wing of the UDF. Several issues were banned during the period of publication but in most cases the ban was later lifted. Volume 1 No 1 is, in fact, unnumbered, but for retrieval purposes an issue number has been assigned.
Relation
1980, Volume 1 No 1, May
1980, Volume 1 No 2,
1980, Volume 1 No 3, October
1980, Volume 1 No 4, November
1981, Volume 2 No 1, February
1981, Volume 2 No 2, March
1981, Volume 2 No 4, April
1981, Volume 2 No 5, July
1981, Volume 2 No 6, August
1981, Volume 2 No 7, September
1981, Volume 2 No 8, October
1982, Volume 3 No 1, February/March
1982, Volume 3 No 2, August
1982, Volume 3 No 4, November
1982, Volume 3 No 3, October
1983, Volume 4 No 1, March
1983, Volume 4 No 2, May
1983, Volume 4 No 3, September
1983, Volume 4 No 4, October
1983, Volume 4 No 5, November
1984, Volume 5 No 1, March
1984, Volume 5 No 2, May/June
1984, Volume 5 No 3, July
1984, Volume 5 No 4, August
1984, Volume 5 No 5, September
1984, Volume 5 No 6, October
1984, Volume 5 No 7, December
1985, Volume 6 No 1, March
1985, Volume 6 No 2, June/July
1985, Volume 6 No 3, December
1986, Volume 7 No 1, February
1986, Volume 7 No 2, April/May
1986, Volume 7 No 3, June
1986, Volume 7 No 4, November/December
1987, Last Quarter
1988, September/October
1989, August/September
48. Searchlight South Africa: a Marxist journal of South African Studies
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1988-1993  
Description
Searchlight South Africa: a Marxist journal of South African Studies was founded by Baruch Hirson from 1988-1993, and to a large extent written by him in collaboration with other exiles and comrades from the revolutionary socialist movement. He was certainly, the moving force behind this privately published journal, Searchlight South Africa, which focussed on a Marxist perspective. The journal was concerned with the political situation of the South African economy with a reflection on capitalism; the working class and the liberation struggle; exposing some of the atrocities committed by the ANC; and articles on the history of the Trotskyists in South Africa. Events from surrounding African states were covered as well as internationally.
Relation
1988 September Number 1
1989 February Number 2
1989 July Number 3
1990 February Number 4
1990 July Number 5
1991 January Number 6
1991 July Number 7
1992 January Number 8
1992 August Number 9
1993 April Number 10
1993 October Number 11
1995 June Number 12
49. Sechaba
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1967-1990  
Description
The African National Congress began publication of Sechaba in 1967. It documents the struggle, from the organisation's perspective, for freedom in South Africa and for the freedom of South Africa - freedom from racial discrimination, from legislation that denied human rights and from the Government's relentless policy of racially imposed injustice. Sechaba documents the process by which the African National Congress, banned in South Africa during the period 1961 to 1990, forged its struggle for freedom, justice and liberation despite being a banned organization.
Relation
Volume 1 Number 1 January 1967
Volume 1 Number 2 February 1967
Volume 1 Number 3 March 1967
Volume 1 Number 4 April 1967
Volume 1 Number 5 May 1967
Volume 1 Number 6 Special Issue June 1967
Volume 1 Number 7 July 1967
Volume 1 Number 8 August 1967
Volume 1 Number 9 September 1967
Volume 1 Number 10 October 1967
Volume 1 Number 11 November 1967
Volume 1 Number 12 December 1967
Volume 2 Number 1 January 1968
Volume 2 Number 2 February 1968
Volume 2 Number 3 March 1968
Volume 2 Number 4 April 1968
Volume 2 Number 5 May 1968
Volume 2 Number 6 June 1968
Volume 2 Number 7 July 1968
Volume 2 Number 8 August 1968
Volume 2 Number 9 September 1968
Volume 2 Number 10 October 1968
Volume 2 Number 11 November 1968
Volume 2 Number 12 December 1968
Volume 3 Number 1 January 1969
Volume 3 Number 2 February 1969
Volume 3 Number 3 March 1969
Volume 3 Number 4 April 1969
Volume 3 Number 5 May 1969
Volume 3 Number 6 June 1969
Volume 3 Number 7 July 1969
Volume 3 Number 8 August 1969
Volume 3 Number 9 September 1969
Volume 3 Number 10 October 1969
Volume 3 Number 11 November 1969
Volume 3 Number 12 December 1969
Volume 4 Number 1 January 1970
Volume 4 Number 2 February 1970
Volume 4 Number 3 March 1970
Volume 4 Number 4 April 1970
Volume 4 Number 5 May 1970
Volume 4 Number 6 June 1970
Volume 4 Number 7 July 1970
Volume 4 Number 8 August 1970
Volume 4 Number 9 September 1970
Volume 4 Number 10 October 1970
Volume 4 Number 11 and 12 November/December 1970
Volume 5 Number 1 January 1971
Volume 5 Number 2 February 1971
Volume 5 Number 3 March 1971
Volume 5 Number 4 April 1971
Volume 5 Number 5 May 1971
Volume 5 Number 6 June 1971
Volume 5 Number 7 July 1971
Volume 5 Number 8 August 1971
Volume 5 Number 9 September 1971
Volume 5 Number 10 October 1971
Volume 5 Number 11 November 1971
Volume 5 Number 12 December 1971 and Volume 6 Number 1 January 1972
Volume 6 Number 2 February 1972
Volume 6 Number 3 March 1972
Volume 6 Number 4 April 1972
Volume 6 Number 5 May 1972
Volume 6 Number 6 June 1972
Volume 6 Number 7 July 1972
Volume 6 Number 8 August 1972
Volume 6 Number 9 September 1972
Volume 6 Number 10 October 1972
Volume 6 Number 11 and 12 November/December 1972
Volume 7 Number 1 January 1973
Volume 7 Number 2 February 1973
Volume 7 Number 3 March 1973
Volume 7 Number 4 April 1973
Volume 7 Number 5 May 1973
Volume 7 Number 6 June 1973
Volume 7 Number 7 July 1973
Volume 7 Number 8 August 1973
Volume 7 Number 9 September 1973
Volume 7 Number 10/11/12 October/November/December 1973
Volume 8 Number 1 January 1974
Volume 8 Number 2 February 1974
Volume 8 Number 3 March 1974
Volume 8 Number 4 April 1974
Volume 8 Number 5 May 1974
Volume 8 Number 6 June 1974
Volume 8 Number 7 July 1974
Volume 8 Number 8 and 9 August/September 1974
Volume 8 Number 10/11/12 October/November/December 1974
Volume 9 Number 1 January 1975
Volume 9 Number 2 February 1975
Volume 9 Number 3 March 1975
Volume 9 Number 4 April 1975
Volume 9 Number 6 and Number 7 June/July 1975
Volume 9 Number 8 and 9 August/September 1975
Volume 9 Number 10 October 1975
Volume 9 Number 11 and 12 November/December 1975
Volume 10 First Quarter 1976
Volume 10 Second Quarter 1976
Volume 10 Third Quarter 1976
Volume 10 Fourth Quarter 1976
Volume 11 First Quarter 1977
Volume 11 Second Quarter 1977
Volume 11 Third Quarter 1977
Volume 11 Fourth Quarter 1977
Volume 12 First Quarter 1978
Volume 12 Second Quarter 1978
Volume 12 Third Quarter 1978
Volume 12 Fourth Quarter 1978
January 1979
February 1979
Volume 13 Number 3 March 1979
April 1979
June 1979
July 1979
August 1979
September 1979
October 1979
November 1979
December 1979
January 1980
February 1980
March 1980
April 1980
May 1980
June 1980
August 1980
September 1980
October 1980
November 1980
December 1980
January 1981
February 1981
March 1981
April 1981
May 1981
June 1981
July 1981
August 1981
September 1981
October 1981
November 1981
December 1981
January 1982
February 1982
March 1982
April 1982
May 1982
June 1982
July 1982
August 1982
September 1982
October 1982
November 1982
December 1982
January 1983
February 1983
March 1983
April 1983
May 1983
June 1983
July 1983
August 1983
September 1983
October 1983
November 1983
December 1983
January 1984
February 1984
March 1984
April 1984
May 1984
June 1984
July 1984
August 1984
September 1984
October 1984
November 1984
December 1984
January 1985
February 1985
March 1985
April 1985
May 1985
June 1985
July 1985
August 1985
September 1985
October 1985
November 1985
December 1985
January 1986
February 1986
March 1986
April 1986
May 1986
June 1986
July 1986
August 1986
September 1986
October 1986
November 1986
December 1986
January 1987
February 1987
March 1987
April 1987
May 1987
June 1987
July 1987
August 1987
September 1987
October 1987
November 1987
December 1987
January 1988
February 1988
March 1988
April 1988
May 1988
Volume 22 Number 6 June 1988
Volume 22 Number 7 July 1988
Volume 22 Number 8 August 1988
Volume 22 Number 9 September 1988
Volume 22 Number 10 October 1988
Volume 22 Number 11 November 1988
Volume 22 Number 12 December 1988
Volume 22 Number 1 January 1989
Volume 23 Number 2 February 1989
Volume 23 Number 3 March 1989
Volume 23 Number 4 April 1989
Volume 23 Number 5 May 1989
Volume 23 Number 6 June 1989
Volume 23 Number 7 July 1989
Volume 23 Number 8 August 1989
Volume 23 Number 9 September 1989
Volume 23 Number 10 October 1989
Volume 23 Number 11 November 1989
Volume 23 Number 12 December 1989
Volume 24 Number 1 January 1990
Volume 24 Number 2 February 1990
Volume 24 Number 3 March 1990
Volume 24 Number 4 April 1990
Volume 24 Number 5 May 1990
Volume 24 Number 6 June 1990
Volume 24 Number 7 July 1990
Volume 24 Number 8 August 1990
Volume 24 Number 9 September 1990
Volume 24 Number 10 October 1990
Volume 24 Number 11 November 1990
Volume 24 Number 12 December 1990
50. South African Labour Bulletin
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
 
Description
South African Labour Bulletin is a refereed journal which supports the democratic labour movement in South Africa. It is a forum for analysing, debating and recording the aims and activities of this movement.
Relation
Volume 1 Number 1 April 1974
Volume 1 Number 2 May 1974
Volume 1 Number 3 June 1974
Volume 1 Number 4 July 1974
Volume 1 Number 6 September/October 1974
Volume 1 Number 7 November/December 1974
Volume 1 Number 9 March 1975
Volume 1 Number 10 April 1975
Volume 2 Number 1 May/June 1975
Volume 2 Number 2 July 1975
Volume 2 Number 3 August 1975
Volume 2 Number 4 September 1975
Volume 2 Number 5 October 1975
Volume 2 Number 8 April 1976
Volume 2 Number 9 and 10 May/June 1976
Volume 3 Number 1 July 1976
Volume 3 Number 2 September 1976
Volume 3 Number 3 October 1976
Volume 3 Number 5 March/April 1977
Volume 3 Number 6 March/April 1977
Volume 3 Number 7 June 1977
Volume 3 Number 8 October 1977
Volume 3 Number 9 November 1977
Volume 4 Number 3 May 1978
Volume 4 Number 4 July 1978
Volume 4 Number 5 September 1978
Volume 4 Number 6 October 1978
Volume 4 Number 7 November 1978
Volume 4 Number 9 and 10 March 1979
Volume 5 Number 3 October 1979
Volume 5 Number 4 November 1979
Volume 5 Number 5 January 1980
Volume 5 Number 6 and 7 March 1980
Volume 5 Number 8 May 1980
Volume 6 Number 1 July 1980
Volume 6 Number 2 and 3 September 1980
Volume 6 Number 4 November 1980
Volume 6 Number 6 March 1981
Volume 6 Number 7 May 1981
Volume 6 Number 8 July 1981
Volume 7 Number 1 and 2 September 1981
Volume 7 Number 3 November 1981
Volume 7 Number 6 and 7 April 1982
Volume 7 Number 8 July 1982
Volume 8 Number 1 September 1982
Volume 8 Number 2 November 1982
Volume 8 Number 6 June 1983
Volume 8 Number 8 and Volume 9 Number 1 September/October 1983
Volume 9 Number 2 November 1983
Volume 9 Number 5 March 1984
Volume 9 Number 6 May 1984
Volume 9 Number 7 June 1984
Volume 9 Number 8 July 1984
Volume 10 Number 1 August/September 1984
Volume 10 Number 2 October/November 1984
Volume 10 Number 4 January/February 1985
Volume 10 Number 5 March 1985
Volume 10 Number 6 May 1985
Volume 10 Number 7 June 1985
Volume 10 Number 8 July/August 1985
Volume 11 Number 1 September 1985
Volume 11 Number 2 October/November/December 1985
Volume 11 Number 3 January 1986
Volume 11 Number 6 June 1986
Volume 12 Number 1 November/December 1986
Volume 12 Number 2 January/February 1987
Volume 12 Number 3 March 1987
Volume 12 Number 4 May/June 1987
Volume 12 Number 5 July 1987
Volume 12 Number 8 October 1987
Volume 13 Number 1 November 1987
Volume 13 Number 3 March/April 1988
Volume 13 Number 4 and 5 June/July 1988
Volume 13 Number 7 November 1988
Volume 14 Number 2 June 1989
Volume 14 Number 4 October 1989
Volume 14 Number 5 November 1989
Volume 14 Number 7 March 1990
Volume 14 Number 8 May 1990
Volume 15 Number 1 June 1990
Volume 15 Number 4 November 1990
Volume 15 Number 5 January 1991
Volume 15 Number 6 March 1991
Volume 15 Number 8 June 1991
Volume 16 Number 1 July/August 1991
Volume 16 Number 2 October/November 1991
Volume 16 Number 3 January 1992
Volume 16 Number 4 March/April 1992
Volume 16 Number 5 May/June 1992
Volume 16 Number 6 July/August 1992
Volume 16 Number 8 November/December 1992
Volume 17 Number 1 January/February 1993
Volume 17 Number 2 March/April 1993
Volume 17 Number 3 May/June 1993
Volume 17 Number 4 July/August 1993
Volume 17 Number 6 November/December 1993
Volume 18 Number 1 January/February 1994
Volume 18 Number 2 May 1994
Volume 18 Number 3 July/August 1994
Volume 18 Number 5 November 1994
Volume 19 Number 1 March 1995
Volume 19 Number 2 May 1995
Volume 19 Number 3 July 1995
Volume 19 Number 4 September 1995
Volume 19 Number 5 November 1995
Volume 19 Number 6 December 1995
Volume 20 Number 1 February 1996
Volume 20 Number 2 April 1996
Volume 20 Number 3 June 1996
Volume 20 Number 4 August 1996
Volume 20 Number 5 October 1996
Volume 20 Number 6 December 1996
Volume 21 Number 1 February 1997
Volume 21 Number 2 April 1997
Volume 21 Number 3 June 1997
Volume 21 Number 4 August 1997
Volume 21 Number 5 October 1997
Volume 21 Number 6 December 1997
Volume 21 Number 1 February 1998
Volume 22 Number 2 April 1998
Volume 22 Number 3 June 1998
Volume 22 Number 4 August 1998
Volume 22 Number 5 October 1998
Volume 22 Number 6 December 1998
Volume 23 Number 1 February 1999
Volume 23 Number 2 April 1999
Volume 23 Number 3 June 1999
Volume 23 Number 4 August 1999
Volume 23 Number 5 October 1999
Volume 23 Number 6 December 1999
Volume 24 Number 1 February 2000
Volume 24 Number 3 June 2000
Volume 24 Number 4 August 2000
Volume 24 Number 5 October 2000
Volume 24 Number 6 December 2000
Volume 25 Number 1 February 2001
Volume 25 Number 2 April 2001
Volume 25 Number 3 June 2001
Volume 25 Number 4 August 2001
Volume 25 Number 5 October 2001
Volume 25 Number 6 December 2001
Volume 26 Number 1 February 2002
Volume 26 Number 2 April 2002
Volume 26 Number 3 June 2002
Volume 26 Number 4 August 2002
51. Speak
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1982-1994  
Description
Speak, published by Speak Collective, is a publication focussing on issues of interest mainly to women. Violence against women, including wife battery and rape, health issues such as pregnancy, contraception and sexually transmitted diseases, better work conditions as well as representation by trade unions, including domestic workers, resistance to the apartheid legislation and the campaign for equitable human rights are among the issues discussed.
Relation
Number 1 May 1982
Number 2 1982
Number 5 March 1984
Number 6 July 1984
Number 7 December 1984
Number 8 April 1985
Number 9 August-November 1985
Number 10 February-April 1986
Number 12 October-December 1986
Number 13 January-March 1987
Number 14 March-May 1987
Number 15 June-August 1987
Number 16 August-October 1987
Number 17 November 1987 to February 1988
March 1988
Number 19 April/May 1988
Number 20 July-August 1988
Number 21 September-November 1988
Number 22 December 1988 to January 1989
Number 23 April/May 1989
Number 24 June-August 1989
Number 25 1989
Number 26 1989
Number 27 1990
Number 28 1990
Number 29 1990
Number 30 1990
Number 31 1990
Number 32 1990
Number 33 1991
Number 34 1991
Number 35 1991
Number 36 1991
Number 37 1991
Number 38 1992
Number 39 May 1992
Number 40 June 1992
Number 41 July 1992
Number 42 August 1992
Number 43 September 1992
Number 44 October 1992
Number 45 November 1992
Number 46 December 1992 to January 1993
March 1993
Number 48 April 1993
Number 49 May 1993
Number 50 June 1993
Number 51 July 1993
Number 52 August 1993
Number 53 September 1993
Number 54 October 1993
Number 55 November 1993
Number 56 December 1993
Number 57 February 1994
Number 58 March 1994
Number 59 April 1994
Number 60 May 1994
Number 61 June 1994
Number 62 July 1994
Number 63 August 1994
Number 64 September 1994
Number 65 October 1994
Number 66 November 1994
Number 67 December 1994
52. Staffrider
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1978-1993  
Description
Staffrider magazine (1978-1993), took its name and identity from township slang for black youth who rode the overcrowded, racially segregated commuter trains by sitting on the roof or hanging onto the outside. This significant literary and cultural magazine enabled the expression of culture, history and protest in the form of poetry, short stories, graphics and photography from the Southern African region. It provided a valuable publishing platform for aspiring writers, artists, photographers and community projects and offered a forum to challenge racial and cultural oppression. The first issue was banned due to its "undesirable" content. Works by well known South Africans were featured alongside previously unpublished authors/artists.
Relation
1978 Vol.1 No.1 Mar
1978 Vol.1 No.2 May-Jun
1978 Vol.1 No.3 Jul-Aug
1978 Vol.1 No.4 Nov-Dec
1979 Vol.2 No.1 Mar
1979 Vol.2 No.2 Apr-May
1979 Vol.2 No.3 Jul-Aug
1979 Vol.2 No.4 Nov-Dec
1980 Vol.3 No.1 Feb
1980 Vol.3 No.2 Jun
1980 Vol.3 No.3 Sep-Oct
1980-1 Vol.3 No.4 Dec-Jan
1981 Vol.4 No.1 Apr-May
1981 Vol.4 No.2 Jul-Aug
1981 Vol.4 No.3 Nov
1982 Vol.4 No.4 Mar
1982 Vol.5 No.1
1982 Vol.5 No.2
1983 Vol.5 No.3
1984 Vol.6 No.1
1985 Vol.6 No.2
1986 Vol.6 No.3
1987 Vol.6 No.4
1988 Vol.7 No.1
1988 Vol.7 No.2
1988 Vol.7 Nos.3 and 4
1989 Vol.8 No.1
1989 Vol.8 No.2
1989 Vol.8 Nos.3 and 4
1990 Vol.9 No.1
1990 Vol.9 No.2
1991 Vol.9 No.3
1991 Vol.9 No.4
1992 Vol.10 No.1
1992 Vol.10 No.2
1992 Vol.10 No.3
1992 Vol.10 No.4
1993 Vol.11 Nos.1,2,3 and 4
53. Theoria: a journal of studies in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1947-1995  
Description
In June 1947, Theoria : a journal of studies of the Arts Faculty, Natal University College was published. Later, the title changed to, Theoria: a journal of studies in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. Theoria aimed at covering all the disciplines in the Faculty of Arts. The issues included articles on a variety of controversial topics such as, contemporary theatre; revolutionary theory; student revolts; Bantu education. In the words of the journals first editors, "Theoria, seeks to promote an outlook of humane criticism in as many fields, and as many groups of people as possible."
Relation
1947 No.1 June
1948
1950 No.3
1952 No.4
1953 No.5
1954 No.6
1955 No.7
1956 No.8
1957 No.9
1958 No.10
1958 No.11
1959 No.12
1959 No.13
1960 No.14
1960 No.15
1961 No.16
1961 No.17
1961 No.18 June
1962 No.19 October
1963 No.20 June
19-- No.21
1964 No.22 June
1964 No.23 October
1965 No.24 June
1965 No.25 October
1966 No.26 June
1966 No.27 October
1967 No.28 May
1967 No.29 October
1968 No.30 May
1968 No.31 October
1969 No.32 May
1969 No.33 October
1970 No.35 October
1971 No.36 May
1971 No.37 October
1972 No.38 May
1972 No.39 October
1973 No.40 May
1973 No.41 October
1974 No.42 June
1974 No.43 December
1975 No.44 May
1975 No.45 October
1976 No.46 May
1976 No.47 October
1977 No.48 May
1977 No.49 October
1978 No.50 May
1978 No.51 October
1979 No.52 May
1979 No.53 October
1980 No.54 May
1980 No.55 October
1981 No.56 May
1981 No.57 October
1982 No.58 May
1982 No.59 October
1983 No.60 May
1983 No.61 October
1984 No.62 May
1984 No.63 October
1985 No.64 May
1985 No.65 October
1986 No.66 May
1986 No.67 October
1986 No.68 December
1987 No.69 May
1987 No.70 October
1988 No.71 May
1988 No.72 October
1989 No.73 May
1989 No.74 October
1990 No.75 May
1990 No.76 May
1991 No.77 May
1991 No.78 October
1992 No.79 May
1992 No.80 October
1993 No.81/82 October
1994 No.83/84 October
1995 No.85 May
1995 No.86 October
54. Umsebenzi
Creator
Resource type
Journals 
Date
1985 - 1993  
Description
Umsebenzi, mouthpiece of the South African Communist Party, deals with issues relating to the national liberation struggle, from a Communist ideological point of view. Other ideologies such as Marxism and Socialism are also discussed. Profiles of prominent South African communists are included as are articles on Party history, trade unionism and workers' rights. Resistance issues are dealt with on an educational and practical level such as what to do if arrested and how to master secret (underground) work.
Relation
1985 Number 1
1985 Number 2
1985 Number 3
1986 Volume 2 Number 1
1986 Volume 2 Number 2
1986 Volume 2 Number 3
1986 Volume 2 Number 4
1987 Volume 3 Number 1
1987 Volume 3 Number 2
1987 Volume 3 Number 3
1987 Volume 3 Number 4
1988 Volume 4 Number 1
1988 Volume 4 Number 2
1988 Volume 4 Number 3
1988 Volume 4 Number 4
1989 Volume 5 Number 1
1989 Volume 5 Number 2
1989 Volume 5 Numbers 3 and 4
1989 Special Issue
1990 Volume 6 Number 1
1990 Volume 6 Number 2
1990 Volume 6 Number 3
1990 Volume 6 Number 4
1991 Volume 7 Number 1
1991 Volume 7 Number 2
1991 Volume 7 Number 3
1991 Volume 7 Number 4
1991 Volume 7 Number 5
1991 Umsebenzi Special Congress Edition 8 December
1992 Volume 8 Number 1
1992 Volume 8 Number 2
1993 Volume 9 Number 1
1993 Volume 9 Number 2
1993 Volume 9 Number 3
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